The institutes and practice of surgery: being the outlines of a course of lectures . f axillary aneurism, yet it isto be lamented that the operation has very seldom succeed-ed. This may perhaps be ascribed to the operation beinggenerally delayed too long, or to the same disposition todisease in the vessel, which gave rise to the aneurism it-self. The operation, however, has proved, very satisfac-torily, that there is no want of collateral branches, andconsequently no danger of gangrene from want of a supplyof blood. The honour of having first successfully tied thesubclavian artery is due to Pr

The institutes and practice of surgery: being the outlines of a course of lectures . f axillary aneurism, yet it isto be lamented that the operation has very seldom succeed-ed. This may perhaps be ascribed to the operation beinggenerally delayed too long, or to the same disposition todisease in the vessel, which gave rise to the aneurism it-self. The operation, however, has proved, very satisfac-torily, that there is no want of collateral branches, andconsequently no danger of gangrene from want of a supplyof blood. The honour of having first successfully tied thesubclavian artery is due to Pr Stock Photo
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The institutes and practice of surgery: being the outlines of a course of lectures . f axillary aneurism, yet it isto be lamented that the operation has very seldom succeed-ed. This may perhaps be ascribed to the operation beinggenerally delayed too long, or to the same disposition todisease in the vessel, which gave rise to the aneurism it-self. The operation, however, has proved, very satisfac-torily, that there is no want of collateral branches, andconsequently no danger of gangrene from want of a supplyof blood. The honour of having first successfully tied thesubclavian artery is due to Professor Post of New York. The project of tying the arteria innominata, in certaincases of axillary and subclavian aneurism, has been sug-gested by different surgeons ; and my friend Dr. Mott, ofNew York, was bold enough, a few years back, to try theexperiment—but without success. A similar operationhas since been performed in Sweden, and with a similarresult. I have no disposition to condemn these attempts, because every effort towards saving the life of a fellow //, //, ? Z V.U. Axillary Aneurism. 93 creature, when he must necessarily perish without relief, should be deemed praiseworthy; but I cannot help think-ing that the chance of success must necessarily (owing tothe great size of the innominata, its contiguity to the heart, and the probable diseased condition of its coats) be so verylimited, in most cases, as not to justify the practice. Ano-ther objection, and a very strong one, that might be urgedagainst tying the innominata, is this—that subclavian andaxillary aneurisms have sometimes been cured spontane-ously. 94 Brachial Jirveuiism. Section V. Brachial Aneurism. It is remarked by Hodgson, that he has never seenan aneurism in the arm which was not produced by acci-dental violence.* The experience of other surgeons con-firms the statement, and proves a diseased condition of thecoats of this vessel to be a very rare occurrence. Themost frequent cause of the aneurism, is

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