The history of General Sir Charles Napier's administration of Scinde, and campaign in the Cutchee Hills . during this difficult cam-paign was the observation of the successful leader. Iknow not if I shall get credit for it; but I think I havedone well. However the play is over. No credit did he get from any person save Sir H. Har-dinge, who behaved as a brother soldier and a public manshould behave; but no thanks came from power in Eng-land, and strenuous efforts were made and successfully toprevent this great campaign becoming known in all itsworth to his countrymen. The skill of the general,

The history of General Sir Charles Napier's administration of Scinde, and campaign in the Cutchee Hills . during this difficult cam-paign was the observation of the successful leader. Iknow not if I shall get credit for it; but I think I havedone well. However the play is over. No credit did he get from any person save Sir H. Har-dinge, who behaved as a brother soldier and a public manshould behave; but no thanks came from power in Eng-land, and strenuous efforts were made and successfully toprevent this great campaign becoming known in all itsworth to his countrymen. The skill of the general, Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2AJHTD8

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1245 x 2007 px | 21.1 x 34 cm | 8.3 x 13.4 inches | 150dpi

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The history of General Sir Charles Napier's administration of Scinde, and campaign in the Cutchee Hills . during this difficult cam-paign was the observation of the successful leader. Iknow not if I shall get credit for it; but I think I havedone well. However the play is over. No credit did he get from any person save Sir H. Har-dinge, who behaved as a brother soldier and a public manshould behave; but no thanks came from power in Eng-land, and strenuous efforts were made and successfully toprevent this great campaign becoming known in all itsworth to his countrymen. The skill of the general, thedevotion, the hardihood of the officers and men, the heroicdeaths of the veterans on the rock were all withheld frompublic approbation: and the persons who sought to stiflethe fame of such actions were those who should have beenforemost to proclaim and reward them. History howevercannot be stifled, though from natural baseness its post-humous vengeance may be disregarded. None of his staffreceived any promotion. Lord BApon long withheld hisdespatch from the public, and when asked why he did so ?. ADMINISTRATION OF SCINDE. 237 answered He had forgotten it! A day, an hour of the CHAP. X.dangers and fatigues of that campaign would have ren- 1845>dered his memory less treacherous, his luxurious existencemore noble; it would have furnished at least one passagein his public life unmarked by public derision or publicindignation. During the operations to reduce Beja, the Murreevakeels had remained in camp, and in fear, because theconduct of the tribe had been so suspicious that theEnglish general, as before noticed, had menaced them.And he could now easily reach them, because the sur-render of Beja left him free action, and there was acannon-road within his power, which, turning the defilesof S art oof and Nufoosk, led upon their town of Kahun.It was that danger which had brought the vakeels tocamp, and meanwhile the tribes removed their familiesand herds forty miles northwards.

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