The Greene family and its branches from A.D861 to A.D1904 . a promising opening. The wealthy church atNewport gave him their first church building, a substantial and sightly edi-fice. It was taken to pieces, loaded on sloops, and carried to Cowesit, thenrebuilt. It proved a great disappointment to the good doctor, who couldnever build up much of a following. He saw more results with the new-comers than with any of the other French settlers. These last gladly availedthemselves of church privileges. July 16, 1741, Dr. McSparran baptized all the children but Grace. Shehad been baptized in France.

The Greene family and its branches from A.D861 to A.D1904 . a promising opening. The wealthy church atNewport gave him their first church building, a substantial and sightly edi-fice. It was taken to pieces, loaded on sloops, and carried to Cowesit, thenrebuilt. It proved a great disappointment to the good doctor, who couldnever build up much of a following. He saw more results with the new-comers than with any of the other French settlers. These last gladly availedthemselves of church privileges. July 16, 1741, Dr. McSparran baptized all the children but Grace. Shehad been baptized in France. Stock Photo
Preview

Image details

Contributor:

The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2AKN0AW

File size:

7.1 MB (452 KB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

1354 x 1845 px | 22.9 x 31.2 cm | 9 x 12.3 inches | 150dpi

More information:

This image is a public domain image, which means either that copyright has expired in the image or the copyright holder has waived their copyright. Alamy charges you a fee for access to the high resolution copy of the image.

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

The Greene family and its branches from A.D861 to A.D1904 . a promising opening. The wealthy church atNewport gave him their first church building, a substantial and sightly edi-fice. It was taken to pieces, loaded on sloops, and carried to Cowesit, thenrebuilt. It proved a great disappointment to the good doctor, who couldnever build up much of a following. He saw more results with the new-comers than with any of the other French settlers. These last gladly availedthemselves of church privileges. July 16, 1741, Dr. McSparran baptized all the children but Grace. Shehad been baptized in France. Four times more in the next ten years, herecords another child baptized, as Ann, Samuel, Margaret, and Paul wereadded to Magdalens familv.* *From records of St. Pauls Church, Narragansett. E. I.. Dr. McSparraiis own writing.Baptisms by Dr. James McSparran. Episcopal Missionary of the Venerable Society of England, forthe Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign parts.King.Susannah of Magdalane at Coesit. July 12.1741Eliza, of Magdalane at Coesit, Julyl2, 1741. ^be (Srccnc jfamil^ 153 The genial doctor, a cultured and brainy man, became a warm friendof Peter L, a Valley, and remained so until the latters death in 1756. Theold Frenchman was buried in the mission graveyard at Warwick. The nextyear Dr. McSparran died, and the mission was given up. The church wasonce more torn down and carried on sloops to the shore of another town, preparatory to being again built up. A terrible storm arose, and when ithad spent its fury, it was fouud that every stick of timber had been sweptinto the ocean. Such was the end of the old church in which all but oneof Magdalen Kings children were baptized. The Kings grew up and foundother church homes. None of them were ever connected again with thischurch in whose faith their grandfather died. The name of the son of Peter La Valley that remained at Warwick, Ido not know. This son was married in France, and had Peter, Michael, and John, borti in France. His ot

Save up to 70% with our image packs

Pre-pay for multiple images and download on demand.

View discounts