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The Great Pagoda, Tanjore [Thanjavur] The Brihadishvara Temple of Thanjavur was patronised by Rajaraja I of the Chola dynasty around AD 1000-10 and is one of the greatest architectural achievements of South India. The temple stands in the middle of a large rectangular court and is entered on the east side through two gateways. The pyramidal tower of the main shrine is around 60 metres high and is covered with intricate sculpture. The mandapa seems unfinished, while the entrance to the temple proper is an addition of the Nayaka Period. From the book ' Oriental scenery: one hundred and fifty vie

The Great Pagoda, Tanjore [Thanjavur] The Brihadishvara Temple of Thanjavur was patronised by Rajaraja I of the Chola dynasty around AD 1000-10 and is one of the greatest architectural achievements of South India. The temple stands in the middle of a large rectangular court and is entered on the east side through two gateways. The pyramidal tower of the main shrine is around 60 metres high and is covered with intricate sculpture. The mandapa seems unfinished, while the entrance to the temple proper is an addition of the Nayaka Period. From the book ' Oriental scenery: one hundred and fifty vie Stock Photo
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Image details

Contributor:

Historic Illustrations / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2G5YNJX

File size:

50.1 MB (1.4 MB Compressed download)

Releases:

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Dimensions:

5244 x 3337 px | 44.4 x 28.3 cm | 17.5 x 11.1 inches | 300dpi

Date taken:

5 January 2012

Location:

India

More information:

This image is a public domain image, which means either that copyright has expired in the image or the copyright holder has waived their copyright. Alamy charges you a fee for access to the high resolution copy of the image.

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

The Great Pagoda, Tanjore [Thanjavur] The Brihadishvara Temple of Thanjavur was patronised by Rajaraja I of the Chola dynasty around AD 1000-10 and is one of the greatest architectural achievements of South India. The temple stands in the middle of a large rectangular court and is entered on the east side through two gateways. The pyramidal tower of the main shrine is around 60 metres high and is covered with intricate sculpture. The mandapa seems unfinished, while the entrance to the temple proper is an addition of the Nayaka Period. From the book ' Oriental scenery: one hundred and fifty views of the architecture, antiquities and landscape scenery of Hindoostan ' by Thomas Daniell, and William Daniell, Published in London by the Authors July 1, 1812

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