. The geology of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island, or, Acadian geology [microform]. Geology; Geology, Stratigraphic; Paleontology; Geology, Economic; Géologie; Géologie stratigraphique; Paléontologie; Géologie économique. LOWKR CARBONIFEROUS OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 235 FiR. M.—Sect''on of the. beds at the East end of Albert Mine, similar to tlmt represented in Fig. C4, and acconipftnied by a partial tearing asunder of the beds. It seems evident that the beds must have been in a soft state at the time when this d'sturbanec occurred, although there may have been subsequently some v

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Library Book Collection / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RJ5M8N
. The geology of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island, or, Acadian geology [microform]. Geology; Geology, Stratigraphic; Paleontology; Geology, Economic; Géologie; Géologie stratigraphique; Paléontologie; Géologie économique. LOWKR CARBONIFEROUS OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 235 FiR. M.—Sect''on of the. beds at the East end of Albert Mine, similar to tlmt represented in Fig. C4, and acconipftnied by a partial tearing asunder of the beds. It seems evident that the beds must have been in a soft state at the time when this d'sturbanec occurred, although there may have been subsequently some vertical shifting, especially on the west side of this ' Jog.' "Beyond this flexure, the deposit contracts in width, and becomes more regular, and cvcntiuilly its containing walls assume a conformable dip to the S. 5° E., at an angle of G9°. The ai)pcarauce presenti-d at the time of my visit in the extreme end of ine most advanced level, is represented in Fig. 66, where it will be observed that the S.E. wall still shows Indications of the prevailing contortions of the beds, and of the maimer In which these cause the ends of strata to abut against the coal. " At this place, a.i exploratory level, driven to the S.E., shows a series of bituminous shales, with bands of ironstone, dipping reguUirly to the south-eastward. I could not, in any part of the mine, find beds corresponding to tlie Stigmarla underclay of ordinary coal-seams, though on the S.E. side some of the beds are of a more compact and purely argillaceous character than those on the N.W. side or roof of the seam. The ironstone bands and fish-bearing shales are, however, not very dissimilar from those in some Coal measures of the ordinary Coal formation. They present no indications of metamorphism or of the passage of heated vapours, and all their appearances show that their bituminous matter has resulted from the presence of organic substances at the time of their deposition. "It is ivident that a

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