The Flying Leatherneck Aviation Museum displays several portraits, including this painting of World War II Marine Corps fighter pilot Col. James E. Swett, a Medal of Honor recipient. The Flying Leatherneck is the only Marine Corps Aviation Museum and was founded April 1, 1999.
RMR7T8XCThe Flying Leatherneck Aviation Museum displays several portraits, including this painting of World War II Marine Corps fighter pilot Col. James E. Swett, a Medal of Honor recipient. The Flying Leatherneck is the only Marine Corps Aviation Museum and was founded April 1, 1999.
Retired Lt. Col. Jay N. Bibler, a former F-4 Phantom pilot and a San Jaquin Valley, Calif., native, admires displays at the Flying Leatherneck Aviation Museum, Dec. 18. Bibler now works in the museum and still is passionate about Marine Corps aviation. Pilot takes off on adventure leading to first Phantom squadron 121218-M-XW721-022
RMHF13M2Retired Lt. Col. Jay N. Bibler, a former F-4 Phantom pilot and a San Jaquin Valley, Calif., native, admires displays at the Flying Leatherneck Aviation Museum, Dec. 18. Bibler now works in the museum and still is passionate about Marine Corps aviation. Pilot takes off on adventure leading to first Phantom squadron 121218-M-XW721-022
Robert Cramsie, left, a restoration volunteer with the Flying Leatherneck Aviation Museum and a board member of the Flying Leatherneck Historical Foundation, displays his award while shaking hands with Col. Jason Woodworth, commanding officer of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., at the Flying Leatherneck Aviation Museum Restoration Facility at MCAS Miramar, Calif., April 21.   Cramsie received the Northrop Grumman Excellence in Volunteerism Award for volunteering more than 2,500 hours to restore a last-of-its-kind Douglas SBD-1 Dauntless dive bomber, reconstructed using blueprints, sal
RMR5YYFTRobert Cramsie, left, a restoration volunteer with the Flying Leatherneck Aviation Museum and a board member of the Flying Leatherneck Historical Foundation, displays his award while shaking hands with Col. Jason Woodworth, commanding officer of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., at the Flying Leatherneck Aviation Museum Restoration Facility at MCAS Miramar, Calif., April 21. Cramsie received the Northrop Grumman Excellence in Volunteerism Award for volunteering more than 2,500 hours to restore a last-of-its-kind Douglas SBD-1 Dauntless dive bomber, reconstructed using blueprints, sal
Robert Cramsie, left, a restoration volunteer with the Flying Leatherneck Aviation Museum and a board member of the Flying Leatherneck Historical Foundation, displays his award while shaking hands with Col. Jason Woodworth, commanding officer of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., at the Flying Leatherneck Aviation Museum Restoration Facility at MCAS Miramar, Calif., April 21.   Cramsie received the Northrop Grumman Excellence in Volunteerism Award for volunteering more than 2,500 hours to restore a last-of-its-kind Douglas SBD-1 Dauntless dive bomber, reconstructed using blueprints, sal
RMMTAMW0Robert Cramsie, left, a restoration volunteer with the Flying Leatherneck Aviation Museum and a board member of the Flying Leatherneck Historical Foundation, displays his award while shaking hands with Col. Jason Woodworth, commanding officer of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., at the Flying Leatherneck Aviation Museum Restoration Facility at MCAS Miramar, Calif., April 21. Cramsie received the Northrop Grumman Excellence in Volunteerism Award for volunteering more than 2,500 hours to restore a last-of-its-kind Douglas SBD-1 Dauntless dive bomber, reconstructed using blueprints, sal