. The floral kingdom : its history, sentiment and poetry : A dictionary of more than three hundred plants, with the genera and families to which they belong, and the language of each illustrated with appropriate gems to poetry . Flower language; Flowers in literature. tof Hib£S rubrUllt. Natural Order: Grossulariacece — Currant Family. .OTANICALLY named from a misapplied Arabic word, and vernacularly from Corinth in Greece, with which it has no special connection, while even the qualifying Latin epithet, ruhruni (red) is a misnomer, as not only red but white cur- j rants are included, it must

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Image ID: PG1WXX
. The floral kingdom : its history, sentiment and poetry : A dictionary of more than three hundred plants, with the genera and families to which they belong, and the language of each illustrated with appropriate gems to poetry . Flower language; Flowers in literature. tof Hib£S rubrUllt. Natural Order: Grossulariacece — Currant Family. .OTANICALLY named from a misapplied Arabic word, and vernacularly from Corinth in Greece, with which it has no special connection, while even the qualifying Latin epithet, ruhruni (red) is a misnomer, as not only red but white cur- j rants are included, it must be confessed this excellent shrub 'has been unfortunate in its godfathers. It is, however, quite familiar to everyone, or if not they have missed one of the blisses of childhood in lying under its branches to pluck the bright, gleaming fruit, hanging like strung rubies in such clusters and bountiful abundance, filled with a healthful and agreeable wine-like juice. The flowers are a delicate green, and M'ould be pretty if of some brilliant tint. The yellow Currant, that grows wild in Missouri and Oregon, is grown as a garden shrub, for the bright and cheering flowers that appear so early in spring- time, and like the robin, are among nature's earliest harbingers of her awakening, and of earth's returning joy.. Itiu |bH^ IIL TTER every tone is music's own, like those of morning birds, And something more than melody dwells ever in her words; The coinage of her heart are they, and from her lips each flows. As one may see the burden'd bee forth issue from the rose. —Edward C. Pitikney. 'T'HY words had such a melting flow, And spoke the truth so sweetly well, They drop'd like heaven's serenest snow. And all was brightness where they fell! —Moore. AH! simple is the spell, I ween, That doth that grace impart; It dwells its own sweet self within- It is — a loving heart! —Mrs. Osgood. A LL are lovely, all blossom of heart and of mind; All true to their natures, as Nature desig

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