The Encyclopaedia Britannica; ..A dictionary of arts, sciences and general literature . ber of laws ben-eficial to the colony and to the repeal of obnox-ious laws. Again the Indians invaded the colonyand Bacon set out to suppress them. He wassuccessful in that; but while he was away fromJamestown, Berkeley undid all the good that hadbeen accomplished. Bacon hastily marched toJamestown, and then began the war that hassince been known as Bacons rebellion. Heattacked Jamestown, compelled Berkeley to evac-uate and take refuge with the fleet in the JamesRiver. Bacons force being too small to do bat

- Image ID: 2AWXGR0
The Encyclopaedia Britannica; ..A dictionary of arts, sciences and general literature . ber of laws ben-eficial to the colony and to the repeal of obnox-ious laws. Again the Indians invaded the colonyand Bacon set out to suppress them. He wassuccessful in that; but while he was away fromJamestown, Berkeley undid all the good that hadbeen accomplished. Bacon hastily marched toJamestown, and then began the war that hassince been known as Bacons rebellion. Heattacked Jamestown, compelled Berkeley to evac-uate and take refuge with the fleet in the JamesRiver. Bacons force being too small to do bat Stock Photo
Enlarge
https://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1 https://www.alamy.com/the-encyclopaedia-britannica-a-dictionary-of-arts-sciences-and-general-literature-ber-of-laws-ben-eficial-to-the-colony-and-to-the-repeal-of-obnox-ious-laws-again-the-indians-invaded-the-colonyand-bacon-set-out-to-suppress-them-he-wassuccessful-in-that-but-while-he-was-away-fromjamestown-berkeley-undid-all-the-good-that-hadbeen-accomplished-bacon-hastily-marched-tojamestown-and-then-began-the-war-that-hassince-been-known-as-bacons-rebellion-heattacked-jamestown-compelled-berkeley-to-evac-uate-and-take-refuge-with-the-fleet-in-the-jamesriver-bacons-force-being-too-small-to-do-bat-image342947332.html
The Encyclopaedia Britannica; ..A dictionary of arts, sciences and general literature . ber of laws ben-eficial to the colony and to the repeal of obnox-ious laws. Again the Indians invaded the colonyand Bacon set out to suppress them. He wassuccessful in that; but while he was away fromJamestown, Berkeley undid all the good that hadbeen accomplished. Bacon hastily marched toJamestown, and then began the war that hassince been known as Bacons rebellion. Heattacked Jamestown, compelled Berkeley to evac-uate and take refuge with the fleet in the JamesRiver. Bacons force being too small to do bat
The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: 2AWXGR0
This image is a public domain image, which means either that copyright has expired in the image or the copyright holder has waived their copyright. Alamy charges you a fee for access to the high resolution copy of the image.
The Encyclopaedia Britannica; ..A dictionary of arts, sciences and general literature . ber of laws ben-eficial to the colony and to the repeal of obnox-ious laws. Again the Indians invaded the colonyand Bacon set out to suppress them. He wassuccessful in that; but while he was away fromJamestown, Berkeley undid all the good that hadbeen accomplished. Bacon hastily marched toJamestown, and then began the war that hassince been known as Bacons rebellion. Heattacked Jamestown, compelled Berkeley to evac-uate and take refuge with the fleet in the JamesRiver. Bacons force being too small to do bat-tle with the fleet, he burned the town. Here,however, his career ended, his premature deathputting an end to the small war. The laws en-acted according to his dictation were known tothe people afterward as Bacons laws. *B.\CTERIOLOGY is that division of botanywhich treats of bacteria. The name bacteria has been ap-plied in a gen-^ eral way tothe wholegroup of Schiz-omycetes, un-der which titlea full discus-sion of theirstructure andclassificationmay be found.They are theminutest of. BACTERI.\L FORMS. II. Bacillus; III. Spiril- o r ga n i s m s ,lum ; IV. Spirochaete; X. Cladothrix; o I .i. o ,t c f^r,o_ I. Coccusim; IV.VI. Beggiatoa. (After Rabenhorst.) always onecelled, thoughthese cells may occur in filamentous chains, or inplates, or in masses, in most cases without chloro-phyll, and with the power of remarkably rapidmultiplication by cell-division, hence very com-monly called fission-fungi. They form a groupclosely related to the Cyaiwphyceee, or blue-greenalgse, and are often associated with them underthe group name Schizophytes. While generally as-sociated with the fungi, some botanists have in-cluded them under algae, on account of theirevident relationship with Cyanophycete and theoccasional presence of chlorophyll. Others sepa-rate them from both algae and fungi, as a separategreat division of thallophytes, along with theCyanophycea. Whatever may be their proper tax-o