The drug plants of Illinois drugplantsofilli44teho Year: 1951 Tehon THE DRUG PLANTS OF ILLINOIS 17 ALETRIS FARINOSA L. Star ^rass, colic-root, ague grass, true unicorn root. Liliaceae.—A stcmlcss, glabrous herb, perennial; roots fibrous, numerous, tough; leaves directly from the crown, lanci-oiatc, acuminate at the tip, narrowed to the base, pale yellow-green, 2 to 6 inches long, up to ^ inch wide; flowers white or yellow tipped, about I/4 inch long, closely set in a spike 4 to 12 inches long at the top of a slender, striate flower stalk li/^ to 3 feet tall. Rootstock and roots collected in

- Image ID: RYF503
The drug plants of Illinois drugplantsofilli44teho Year: 1951 Tehon THE DRUG PLANTS OF ILLINOIS 17 ALETRIS FARINOSA L. Star ^rass, colic-root, ague grass, true unicorn root. Liliaceae.—A stcmlcss, glabrous herb, perennial; roots fibrous, numerous, tough; leaves directly from the crown, lanci-oiatc, acuminate at the tip, narrowed to the base, pale yellow-green, 2 to 6 inches long, up to ^ inch wide; flowers white or yellow tipped, about I/4 inch long, closely set in a spike 4 to 12 inches long at the top of a slender, striate flower stalk li/^ to 3 feet tall. Rootstock and roots collected in
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Image ID: RYF503
The drug plants of Illinois drugplantsofilli44teho Year: 1951 Tehon THE DRUG PLANTS OF ILLINOIS 17 ALETRIS FARINOSA L. Star ^rass, colic-root, ague grass, true unicorn root. Liliaceae.—A stcmlcss, glabrous herb, perennial; roots fibrous, numerous, tough; leaves directly from the crown, lanci-oiatc, acuminate at the tip, narrowed to the base, pale yellow-green, 2 to 6 inches long, up to ^ inch wide; flowers white or yellow tipped, about I/4 inch long, closely set in a spike 4 to 12 inches long at the top of a slender, striate flower stalk li/^ to 3 feet tall. Rootstock and roots collected in the fall. Limited to wooded sandy regions - and occurring chiefly in the northeastern quar- ter of the state; July through August. Contains a bitter principle. Used as a uterine tonic, diuretic, emetic, and diaphoret- ic. ALNUS SERRULATA Willd. [A. rugosa (Du Roi) Spreng.] Tag alder, black alder, smooth alder, red alder. Betulaceae.—A shrub up to 20 feet tall; stems usually several; bark smooth, red- dish brown to gray, thin; twigs hairy at first, later smooth and covered with small, dark specks; leaves alternate, obovate, serrate, 3 to 5 inches long, wedge-shaped at the base, often somewhat hairy on the veins below; the veins prominent below, straight, ending in the marginal teeth; male flowers in catkins 2 to 4 inches long; fe- male flowers and fruit in ovoid, woody cones 1/2 to ^ inch long. Bark of the stems collected in early spring or late fall. Rare along streams in wooded, hilly regions in southern Illi- nois. Contains tannin. Used as an alterative and astringent. ALTHAEA ROSEA Gav. Black malva, hollyhock. Malvaceae. The flowers collected. Grown as a dec- orative plant throughout the state and commonly escaping but not becoming estab- lished. Contains mucilage. Used as a demulcent and emollient.