The dramatic works of William Shakespeare : accurately printed from the text of the corrected copy left by the late George Steevens, Esq: with a glossary, and notes, and a sketch of the life of Shakespeare . h order in this great solemnity. [Exeunt. This play keeps curiosity always busy, and thepassions always interested. The continual hurryof the action, the variety of incidents, and the quicksuccession of one personage to another, call themind forward without intermission, from the firstact to the last. But the power of delighting is de-rived principally from the frequent changes of thescene

The dramatic works of William Shakespeare : accurately printed from the text of the corrected copy left by the late George Steevens, Esq: with a glossary, and notes, and a sketch of the life of Shakespeare . h order in this great solemnity. [Exeunt. This play keeps curiosity always busy, and thepassions always interested. The continual hurryof the action, the variety of incidents, and the quicksuccession of one personage to another, call themind forward without intermission, from the firstact to the last. But the power of delighting is de-rived principally from the frequent changes of thescene Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2AKPX2A

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7.1 MB (782.2 KB Compressed download)

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1904 x 1312 px | 32.2 x 22.2 cm | 12.7 x 8.7 inches | 150dpi

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The dramatic works of William Shakespeare : accurately printed from the text of the corrected copy left by the late George Steevens, Esq: with a glossary, and notes, and a sketch of the life of Shakespeare . h order in this great solemnity. [Exeunt. This play keeps curiosity always busy, and thepassions always interested. The continual hurryof the action, the variety of incidents, and the quicksuccession of one personage to another, call themind forward without intermission, from the firstact to the last. But the power of delighting is de-rived principally from the frequent changes of thescene ; for, except the feminine arts, some of whichare too low, which distinguish Cleopatra, no charac-ter is very strongly discriminated. Upton, who didnot easily miss what he desired to find, has discov-ered that the language of Antony is, with greatskill and learning, made pompous and superb, ac-cording to his real practice. But I think his dic-tion not distinguishable from that of others: themost tumid speech in the play is that which Caesarmakes to Octavia. The events, of which the principal are describedaccording to history, are produced without any artof connection or care of disposition. JOHNSON.. Act 11.—Scene 2.

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