The dramatic works of William Shakespeare : accurately printed from the text of the corrected copy left by the late George Steevens, Esq: with a glossary, and notes, and a sketch of the life of Shakespeare . be useless and wantoncruelty. Hamlet is, through the whole piece, rather an in-strument than an agent. After he has, by the strat-agem of the play, convicted the king-, he makes noattempt to punish him; and his deatn is at last ef-fected by an incident which Hamlet had no part inproducing. The catastrophe is not very happily produced;the exchange of weapons is rather an expedient ofnecessi

The dramatic works of William Shakespeare : accurately printed from the text of the corrected copy left by the late George Steevens, Esq: with a glossary, and notes, and a sketch of the life of Shakespeare . be useless and wantoncruelty. Hamlet is, through the whole piece, rather an in-strument than an agent. After he has, by the strat-agem of the play, convicted the king-, he makes noattempt to punish him; and his deatn is at last ef-fected by an incident which Hamlet had no part inproducing. The catastrophe is not very happily produced;the exchange of weapons is rather an expedient ofnecessi Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2AKPNMH

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1886 x 1325 px | 31.9 x 22.4 cm | 12.6 x 8.8 inches | 150dpi

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The dramatic works of William Shakespeare : accurately printed from the text of the corrected copy left by the late George Steevens, Esq: with a glossary, and notes, and a sketch of the life of Shakespeare . be useless and wantoncruelty. Hamlet is, through the whole piece, rather an in-strument than an agent. After he has, by the strat-agem of the play, convicted the king-, he makes noattempt to punish him; and his deatn is at last ef-fected by an incident which Hamlet had no part inproducing. The catastrophe is not very happily produced;the exchange of weapons is rather an expedient ofnecessity, than a stroke of art. A scheme might easily be formed, to kill Hamlet with the daggerand Laertes with the bowl. The poet is accused of having shown little re-gard to poetical justice, and may be charged withequal neglect of poetical probability. The appari-tion left the regions of the dead to little purpose:the revenge which he demands is not obtained, butby the death of him that was required to take it;and the gratification, which would arise from thedestruction of a usurper and a murderer, is abatedby the untimely death of Ophelia, the young, thebeautiful, the harmless, and the pious. JOHNSON.. OTHELLO. Act V Sceoe 2. ( 440 } OTHELLO, THE MOOR OF VENICE. PERSONS REPRESENTED. Diike of Venice. Brubantio, a senator^ Two other Senators. , Gratiano, brother to Brabantio. Lodovico, kins7nan to Brabantio. Othello, the Moor. Cassio, his lieutenant. I ago, his ancient. Roderigo, a Ve7ietian gentleman. Montano, Othellos predecessor in the government of Cyprus.Cloion, servant to Othello. Herald. Desdemona, daughter to BrahantiOt and wife to Othello.Emilia, wife to lago.Bianca, a courtezan, mistress to Cassio. Officers, Gentlemen, Messengers, MiLsicianSj Sailors, Attendants, ^c. Scene, for the first Act, in Venice; during the restof the play, at a sea-port in Cyprus. ACT I. SCEJ^E /.—Venice. A street.and lago. Roderigo. Enter Roderigo 1 USH, never tell me, I take it much unkindly, T

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