The dramatic works of William Shakespeare : accurately printed from the text of the corrected copy left by the late George Steevens, Esq: with a glossary, and notes, and a sketch of the life of Shakespeare . are and negligence. Theversification is often excellent, the allusions arelearned and just; but the author conveys hisheroes by sea from one inland town to another inthe same country: he places the emperor at Milan,and sends his young men to attend him, but nevermentions him more; he makes Proteus, after aninterview with Silvia, say he has only seen her pic-ture : and; if we may credit the

The dramatic works of William Shakespeare : accurately printed from the text of the corrected copy left by the late George Steevens, Esq: with a glossary, and notes, and a sketch of the life of Shakespeare . are and negligence. Theversification is often excellent, the allusions arelearned and just; but the author conveys hisheroes by sea from one inland town to another inthe same country: he places the emperor at Milan,and sends his young men to attend him, but nevermentions him more; he makes Proteus, after aninterview with Silvia, say he has only seen her pic-ture : and; if we may credit the Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2ANFYFJ

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1932 x 1293 px | 32.7 x 21.9 cm | 12.9 x 8.6 inches | 150dpi

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The dramatic works of William Shakespeare : accurately printed from the text of the corrected copy left by the late George Steevens, Esq: with a glossary, and notes, and a sketch of the life of Shakespeare . are and negligence. Theversification is often excellent, the allusions arelearned and just; but the author conveys hisheroes by sea from one inland town to another inthe same country: he places the emperor at Milan, and sends his young men to attend him, but nevermentions him more; he makes Proteus, after aninterview with Silvia, say he has only seen her pic-ture : and; if we may credit the old copies, he has, by mistaking places, left his scenery inextricable.The reason of all this confusion seems to be, thathe took his story from a novel which he sometimesfollowed and sometimes forsook; sometimes re-membered, and sometimes forgot. That this play is rightly attributed to Shak-speare, I have little doubt. If it be taken from him, to whom shall it be given ? This question may beasked of all the disputed plays, except Titus An-dronicus; and it will be found more credible, thatShakspeare might sometimes sink below his highestflights, than that any other should rise up to hislowest. JOHNSON.. AAiiRRY WIVES OF WINDSOR. Act V.—Scene 5.

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