. The dog book : a popular history of the dog, with practical information as to care and management of house, kennel, and exhibition dogs, and descriptions of all the important breeds . Dogs. CHAPTER LXVII The Japanese Spaniel. NE of the few foreign breeds that seem to have been taken up here before becoming an English show dog is the Japanese spaniel. We seem also to be in possession of information regarding these spaniels at as early a period as anything was published in England, and both date back to official docu- ments. The first English record is that of Robert Fortune, who was com- miss

. The dog book : a popular history of the dog, with practical information as to care and management of house, kennel, and exhibition dogs, and descriptions of all the important breeds . Dogs. CHAPTER LXVII The Japanese Spaniel. NE of the few foreign breeds that seem to have been taken up here before becoming an English show dog is the Japanese spaniel. We seem also to be in possession of information regarding these spaniels at as early a period as anything was published in England, and both date back to official docu- ments. The first English record is that of Robert Fortune, who was com- miss Stock Photo
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. The dog book : a popular history of the dog, with practical information as to care and management of house, kennel, and exhibition dogs, and descriptions of all the important breeds . Dogs. CHAPTER LXVII The Japanese Spaniel. NE of the few foreign breeds that seem to have been taken up here before becoming an English show dog is the Japanese spaniel. We seem also to be in possession of information regarding these spaniels at as early a period as anything was published in England, and both date back to official docu- ments. The first English record is that of Robert Fortune, who was com- missioned by the Indian government to visit China and Japan to obtain in- formation regarding the tea plant and its cultivation. He mentions the Japanese lap-dog as being much prized and as having snub noses, but he must have been misqiioted or made a slip of the pen when sunken eyes were mentioned as characteristic of the breed. Our American authority is no less than Commodore Perry whose ex- pedition to Japan was made fifty years ago. From "Commodore Perry's Expedition to Japan, " Appleton's 1857 edition, we quote as follows; "The Commodore upon subsequent enquiry learned that there are three articles which in Japan, as he understood, always form part of an Imperial present. These are rice, dried fish, and dogs. Some also said that charcoal was always included. Why these should have been selected or what they particularly symbolise he did not learn. The charcoal was not omitted in the gifts on this occasion, and four small dogs of a rare breed were sent to the President as part of the Emperor's gift. We have observed also in the public prints that two were put on board of Admiral Stirling's ship for her Majesty of England, . "The fact that dogs are always part of a royal Japanese present sug- gested to the Commodore the thought that possibly one species of spaniel now in England may be traced to Japanese origin. In ibi^ when Captain Saris returned from Japan to

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