The diffusion of gases through liquids and allied experiments . the diver, the result would be nil in the lapse of time, supposingthere is no continuous mean rise or fall of temperature, the latter in itseffects being indistinguishable from diffusion. The issue in question,however, is the change of composition of the imprisoned air, which becomescither relatively rich or poor in oxygen; and this modifies the gradientscorrespondingly. Any change of barometric pressure, moreover, is felt inthe gas inside and outside of the diver at once, but it does not follow thatit is also felt in the pores of

The diffusion of gases through liquids and allied experiments . the diver, the result would be nil in the lapse of time, supposingthere is no continuous mean rise or fall of temperature, the latter in itseffects being indistinguishable from diffusion. The issue in question,however, is the change of composition of the imprisoned air, which becomescither relatively rich or poor in oxygen; and this modifies the gradientscorrespondingly. Any change of barometric pressure, moreover, is felt inthe gas inside and outside of the diver at once, but it does not follow thatit is also felt in the pores of Stock Photo
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The diffusion of gases through liquids and allied experiments . the diver, the result would be nil in the lapse of time, supposingthere is no continuous mean rise or fall of temperature, the latter in itseffects being indistinguishable from diffusion. The issue in question, however, is the change of composition of the imprisoned air, which becomescither relatively rich or poor in oxygen; and this modifies the gradientscorrespondingly. Any change of barometric pressure, moreover, is felt inthe gas inside and outside of the diver at once, but it does not follow thatit is also felt in the pores of the liquid. There will probably be diffusionout of and into the pores of the liquid as the barometer falls and rises, respectively, at a slow rate and thus not easily observable. The presence, finally, of any absorbent of a gas within the liquid, as, for instance, the caseof bright copper, may confuse the result. Finally, the discrepancy between the results obtained in a closed manom-eter in the lapse of years and the above results with the diver in the lapse. Fig. 38.—Chart showing variation of volume coeflScients ofdiffusion at standard pressure and temperature withcomposilioii and density of solution. of months must be considered. These experiments have been in progressfor so short a time, relatively speaking, that all interpretation is merelytentative. It would not be consistent if carried into detail. Nevertheless, if we suppose the gas contained in the pores of a liquid to be relatively fixed, then the presence of convection currents due to gradual changes of temper-ature on the outside of the apparatus would carry the more compressed gasof the lower level to the free surface, and conversely. Such an effect, whichis equivalent to an increase of gradient, being absent in the narrow tube ofthe manometer, diffusion should be slower in the latter case, as it appearsto be. Here, however, the identity of the small amount of gas in the twoshanks of the U-tube is in question. If t

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