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The diffusion of gases through liquids and allied experiments . 00550 g/day = 64X lo^^g/sec.and it thus much exceeds the converse case of table 2; but this rapid influxis soon reduced in the lapse of time. The bubble phenomenon, due to the diffusion of hydrogen into micro-scopic air-bubbles adhering to solid parts, under water, was equally promi-nent. During the early days these gathered in great quantity and had tobe shaken off. It would be interesting to estimate the virtual pressure at LIQUIDS AND ALLIED EXPERIMENTS. 27 which the bubbles are initially expanded. In fact, if the pressure with

The diffusion of gases through liquids and allied experiments . 00550 g/day = 64X lo^^g/sec.and it thus much exceeds the converse case of table 2; but this rapid influxis soon reduced in the lapse of time. The bubble phenomenon, due to the diffusion of hydrogen into micro-scopic air-bubbles adhering to solid parts, under water, was equally promi-nent. During the early days these gathered in great quantity and had tobe shaken off. It would be interesting to estimate the virtual pressure at LIQUIDS AND ALLIED EXPERIMENTS. 27 which the bubbles are initially expanded. In fact, if the pressure with Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2AJBWPK

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1829 x 1366 px | 31 x 23.1 cm | 12.2 x 9.1 inches | 150dpi

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The diffusion of gases through liquids and allied experiments . 00550 g/day = 64X lo^^g/sec.and it thus much exceeds the converse case of table 2; but this rapid influxis soon reduced in the lapse of time. The bubble phenomenon, due to the diffusion of hydrogen into micro-scopic air-bubbles adhering to solid parts, under water, was equally promi-nent. During the early days these gathered in great quantity and had tobe shaken off. It would be interesting to estimate the virtual pressure at LIQUIDS AND ALLIED EXPERIMENTS. 27 which the bubbles are initially expanded. In fact, if the pressure withinbe taken as p = ^T/r, where T is the surface tension and r the radius of thesphere, if the bubbles grow almost from the order of microscopic dimensions,say from r= io~* cm., we may put /> = 4X8o/io~^ = 3.2Xio^ dynes/cm.^ Thus the initial pressure would have to be of the order of several atmos-pheres, if this explanation is correct. As not more than one atmosphereis available, the original air-bubbles should be larger than 6Xio~^ cm. indiameter to expand.. <J{ak. 5 Fig. 8.—Chart showing loss of mass of gas in diver in lapse of days.Diffusion of air into hydrogen. Between March 9 and 16 the rate has somewhat abruptly decreased(a to h in curve). Between March 16 and 30 the weight of the imprisoned air was nearlystationary {h to c in curve), a condition of things which has again beenreached abruptly. Hence the per second influx of hydrogen and the effluxof air are here about equal, remembering, however, that m is not the actualmass. From March 20 the pronounced efflux suddenly begins, at a specificthough slowly increasing rate until April 30 {cde in curve). It would seemto be probable that during this interval the content of the swimmer islargely hydrogen; and yet the apparent mass rate of efflux is m= 160Xio~* g/day or 18Xlo^* g/sec. a relatively large value. 28 THE DIFFUSION OF GASES THROUGH Since the area of diffusion is 0 = 6.4 cm.^ and // = 10 cm. h = 5 cm. / = // +

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