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. The dawn of civilization: Egypt and Chaldaea . clown to us, is mentioned by Ûni ;this is Queen Amîtsi, wife of Mirirî-Papi I. of the VIth dynasty (E. de Rouge, Becherches sur lesmonuments, p. 121; cf. Erman, Commentar zur Inschrift des Una, in the Zeitschrift, 1881, pp. 10, 11). 5 It would seem that Queen Mirisônkhû (Mariette, Les Mastabas, p. 183 ; Lepsius, Denhm., ii.14, 26), wife of Khephren, was the daughter of Kheops, and consequently her husbands sister (E. deRouge, Becherches sur les monuments quon peut attribuer aux six premières dynasties de Manéthon,pp. 61, 62). 6 The preamble of t

. The dawn of civilization: Egypt and Chaldaea . clown to us, is mentioned by Ûni ;this is Queen Amîtsi, wife of Mirirî-Papi I. of the VIth dynasty (E. de Rouge, Becherches sur lesmonuments, p. 121; cf. Erman, Commentar zur Inschrift des Una, in the Zeitschrift, 1881, pp. 10, 11). 5 It would seem that Queen Mirisônkhû (Mariette, Les Mastabas, p. 183 ; Lepsius, Denhm., ii.14, 26), wife of Khephren, was the daughter of Kheops, and consequently her husbands sister (E. deRouge, Becherches sur les monuments quon peut attribuer aux six premières dynasties de Manéthon,pp. 61, 62). 6 The preamble of t Stock Photo
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1473 x 1697 px | 24.9 x 28.7 cm | 9.8 x 11.3 inches | 150dpi

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. The dawn of civilization: Egypt and Chaldaea . clown to us, is mentioned by Ûni ;this is Queen Amîtsi, wife of Mirirî-Papi I. of the VIth dynasty (E. de Rouge, Becherches sur lesmonuments, p. 121; cf. Erman, Commentar zur Inschrift des Una, in the Zeitschrift, 1881, pp. 10, 11). 5 It would seem that Queen Mirisônkhû (Mariette, Les Mastabas, p. 183 ; Lepsius, Denhm., ii.14, 26), wife of Khephren, was the daughter of Kheops, and consequently her husbands sister (E. deRouge, Becherches sur les monuments quon peut attribuer aux six premières dynasties de Manéthon,pp. 61, 62). 6 The preamble of the queens of this period was settled for the first time by E. de Rougé (Becherches■sur les monuments, pp. 44, 45, 57-61, 130), on the authority of the inscriptions of Queen Mirtîttefsi THE ROYAL HAREM—THE QUEEN. 271 goddess, and entailed upon her the fulfilment of all the duties which a goddessowed to a god. They were varied and important. The woman, indeed, wassupposed to combine in herself more completely than a man the qualities. PHARAOH GIVES SOLEMN AUDIENCE TO ONE OP HIS MINISTERS. necessary for the exercise of magic, whether legitimate or otherwise : she sawand beard that which the eyes and ears of man could not perceive ; her voice,being more flexible and piercing, was heard at greater distances; she was (E. and J. de Rougé, Inscriptions hiéroglyphiques copiées en Égypte, pl. lxii.), of Queen Mirisônkhû(Mariette, Les Mastabas, p. 183.; Lepsius, Denhm., ii. 14), of Queen Khûît (Mariette, Les Mastabas,pp. 207, 208), of a queen whose name is still uncertain (Mariette, Les Mastabas, pp. 225), and ofQueen Mirirîônkhnas (E. and J. de Rougé, Inscriptions hiéroglyphiques copiées en Egypte, pl. cliii.). 1 Drawn by Faucker-Gudin, after Lepsius, Lenlm., iii. 77. The king is Amenôthes III.(XVIIIth dynasty). 272 THE POLITICAL CONSTITUTION OF EGYPT. by nature mistress of the art of summoning or banishing invisible beings.While Pharaoh was engaged in sacrific

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