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. The dairyman's manual; a practical treatise on the dairy. Dairying. 372 THE dairyman's MAN^UAL. served sweet for two or three days and then made into cheese ; or the curd may be kept as above mentioned and added to the new curd, in which case the rich quality of the cheese may be preserved. The milk may be curdled in a large jar or tin pail, or in several of them, and the curd may be carefully lifted with a common dipper or ladle, and placed at once in small cylindrical molds of tin (figure 83). Empty fruit cans, from which the top and bottom have been melted, and which have been cut down to

. The dairyman's manual; a practical treatise on the dairy. Dairying. 372 THE dairyman's MAN^UAL. served sweet for two or three days and then made into cheese ; or the curd may be kept as above mentioned and added to the new curd, in which case the rich quality of the cheese may be preserved. The milk may be curdled in a large jar or tin pail, or in several of them, and the curd may be carefully lifted with a common dipper or ladle, and placed at once in small cylindrical molds of tin (figure 83). Empty fruit cans, from which the top and bottom have been melted, and which have been cut down to Stock Photo
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. The dairyman's manual; a practical treatise on the dairy. Dairying. 372 THE dairyman's MAN^UAL. served sweet for two or three days and then made into cheese ; or the curd may be kept as above mentioned and added to the new curd, in which case the rich quality of the cheese may be preserved. The milk may be curdled in a large jar or tin pail, or in several of them, and the curd may be carefully lifted with a common dipper or ladle, and placed at once in small cylindrical molds of tin (figure 83). Empty fruit cans, from which the top and bottom have been melted, and which have been cut down to four inches in length, will serve the purpose very well. From five to six hours . are required to form the curd. The molds are filled with the curd as they stand on the rush mats on the draining table before de- "yyyyyyyMMwy. ^n^f Fig. 83. TIN MOLD AND STRAW MAT. Fig. 84. FRAME FOR DRAINING CHEESE. scribed ; the whey gradually flows away, and in tYO days the cheeses will have become firm enough for the mold to be lifted off from them. The cheeses are sprinkled with salt and left on the mats for three or four days, when they will be ready for the curing. This may be done on a shelf of narrow laths placed six inches apart. The cheeses are placed on a frame of laths shown at fig- ure 84, the frame being kept on the shelf, but removed to the table when it is necessary to salt and turn the cheeses. The cheese during the curing should be ex- posed to abundant currents of air, for it is on this airing that the effect of tlie curing depends. It is this system of curing which gives the exquisite flavor to the small foreign cheeses, as the Roquefort, the Camembert, and. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Stewart, Henry. New York, Orange Judd