. The comedies, histories, tragedies, and poems of William Shakspere. onvenient. 326 TWELFTH NIGHT. [ACT V. Of our dear souls—Meantime, sweet sister, We will not part from hence.—Cesario, come ; For so you shall be while you are a man ; But, when in other habits you are seen, Orsinos mistress, and his fancys queen. [Exeunt. SONG. Clo> When that I was and a little tiny boy, With hey, ho, the wind and the rain,A foolish thing was but a toy,For the rain it raineth every day. But when I came to mans estate, With hey, ho, the wind and the rain,Gainst knaves and thieves men shut their gate, For t

. The comedies, histories, tragedies, and poems of William Shakspere. onvenient. 326 TWELFTH NIGHT. [ACT V. Of our dear souls—Meantime, sweet sister, We will not part from hence.—Cesario, come ; For so you shall be while you are a man ; But, when in other habits you are seen, Orsinos mistress, and his fancys queen. [Exeunt. SONG. Clo> When that I was and a little tiny boy, With hey, ho, the wind and the rain,A foolish thing was but a toy,For the rain it raineth every day. But when I came to mans estate, With hey, ho, the wind and the rain,Gainst knaves and thieves men shut their gate, For t Stock Photo
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. The comedies, histories, tragedies, and poems of William Shakspere. onvenient. 326 TWELFTH NIGHT. [ACT V. Of our dear souls—Meantime, sweet sister, We will not part from hence.—Cesario, come ; For so you shall be while you are a man ; But, when in other habits you are seen, Orsinos mistress, and his fancys queen. [Exeunt. SONG. Clo> When that I was and a little tiny boy, With hey, ho, the wind and the rain, A foolish thing was but a toy, For the rain it raineth every day. But when I came to mans estate, With hey, ho, the wind and the rain, Gainst knaves and thieves men shut their gate, For the rain it raineth every day.But when I came, alas ! to wive. With hey, ho, the wind and the rain, By swaggering could I never thrive. For the rain it raineth every day.But when I came unto my bed, With hey, ho, the wind and the rain.With toss-pots still had drunken head. For the rain it raineth every day. A great while ago the world begun. With hey, bo, the wind and the rain, But that -s all one, our play is done. And we 11 strive to please you every day. [Exit.. ILLUSTRATIONS. ACT I. Scene I.— That strain again;—it had a, dying fall.By fall is meant cadence (from cado), a musi-cal term, signifying the close of a passage orphrase, and which commonly includes the tran-sition from the dissonant to a consonant sound;or, in the language of Lord Bacon, {Sylva Syl-varum, i. 113, ) the falling from a discord toa concord, which maketh great sweetnesse inmusicke. Milton, in Comus, uses the wordin the same sense as Shakspere; and Pope, inhis Ode to St. Cecilias Day, has dying fall. Dying probably means a diminution of sound, technically expressed by the Italian term dimi-nuendo. 2 Scene I.— Like the sweet sound.Let us consider whether Shakspere wasmost likely to have written sound or south, whichinvolves the question of which is the betterword. Steevens tells us that the thought mighthave been borrowed from Sydneys Arcadia, Book I., and he quotes a part of the passage.We must look,

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