. The comedies, histories, tragedies, and poems of William Shakspere. of thepractical part of the Eoman law, which it ispretty plain his commentators had not at theirfingers ends, we in our turn leave to the reader*to say. Scene Y.— Ducddme, ducddme, ducddme.Hanmer turned this into Latin—due ad me.When Amiens asks Whats that ducdamelJaques replies, T is a Greek invocation. Itwas not in the character of Jaques to talk Latinin this place. He was parodying the Comehither, come hither, come hither, of the previoussong. The conjecture, therefore, that he wasusing some country call of a woman to her

. The comedies, histories, tragedies, and poems of William Shakspere. of thepractical part of the Eoman law, which it ispretty plain his commentators had not at theirfingers ends, we in our turn leave to the reader*to say. Scene Y.— Ducddme, ducddme, ducddme.Hanmer turned this into Latin—due ad me.When Amiens asks Whats that ducdamelJaques replies, T is a Greek invocation. Itwas not in the character of Jaques to talk Latinin this place. He was parodying the Comehither, come hither, come hither, of the previoussong. The conjecture, therefore, that he wasusing some country call of a woman to her Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2AG28GG

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1538 x 1624 px | 26 x 27.5 cm | 10.3 x 10.8 inches | 150dpi

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. The comedies, histories, tragedies, and poems of William Shakspere. of thepractical part of the Eoman law, which it ispretty plain his commentators had not at theirfingers ends, we in our turn leave to the reader*to say. Scene Y.— Ducddme, ducddme, ducddme.Hanmer turned this into Latin—due ad me.When Amiens asks Whats that ducdamelJaques replies, T is a Greek invocation. Itwas not in the character of Jaques to talk Latinin this place. He was parodying the Comehither, come hither, come hither, of the previoussong. The conjecture, therefore, that he wasusing some country call of a woman to herducks, appears much more rational than hislatinity. Scene VII.—And then he drew a dial fromhis poTce. Theres no clock in the forest, says Orlando, and it was not very likely that the fool wouldhave a pocket clock. What then was the dialthat he took from his poke? We have latelybecome possessed of a rude instrument kindlypresented to us by a friend, Avhich, as the Maidof Orleans found her sword, he picked out ofa deal of old iron. It is a brass circle of about. two inches diameter: on the outer side areengraved letters indicating the names of themonths, with graduated divisions; and on the SCENE VII. AS YOU LIKE IT. 247 inner side the hours of the day. The brasscircle itself is to be held in one position by aring; but there is an inner slide in which thereis a small orifice. This slide being moved sothat the hole stands opposite the division of themonth when the day falls of which we desire toknow the time, the circle is held up opposite thesun. The inner side is of course then in shade;but the sunbeam shines through the little orificeand forms a point of light upon the hour markedon the inner side. We have tried this dial andfound it give the hour with great exactness. Scene VII.— What, fo7- a counter, vjould I do but good ? The wager proposed by Jaques was not a very heavy one. Jettons or counters, which are small and very thin, are generally of copper or brass. but occa

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