The comedies, histories, tragedies, and poems of William Shakspere . elaboratedevice than the pageant; and, therefore, weshall confine the remainder of this Illustrationto some few general observations on the subjectof pageants. We maj^ infer, from the expression of Julia in the fourth act,— At Pentecost,When all our pageants of delight were playd, that the pageant was a religious ceremonial,connected with the festivals of the church.And so it originally was. (See Studies, page 3.)It is clear, from the passage in which Juliadescribes her own part in the pageants ofdelight,— Ariadne passioningF

The comedies, histories, tragedies, and poems of William Shakspere . elaboratedevice than the pageant; and, therefore, weshall confine the remainder of this Illustrationto some few general observations on the subjectof pageants. We maj^ infer, from the expression of Julia in the fourth act,— At Pentecost,When all our pageants of delight were playd, that the pageant was a religious ceremonial,connected with the festivals of the church.And so it originally was. (See Studies, page 3.)It is clear, from the passage in which Juliadescribes her own part in the pageants ofdelight,— Ariadne passioningF Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2AJAY26

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1372 x 1822 px | 23.2 x 30.9 cm | 9.1 x 12.1 inches | 150dpi

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The comedies, histories, tragedies, and poems of William Shakspere . elaboratedevice than the pageant; and, therefore, weshall confine the remainder of this Illustrationto some few general observations on the subjectof pageants. We maj^ infer, from the expression of Julia in the fourth act, — At Pentecost, When all our pageants of delight were playd, that the pageant was a religious ceremonial, connected with the festivals of the church.And so it originally was. (See Studies, page 3.)It is clear, from the passage in which Juliadescribes her own part in the pageants ofdelight, — Ariadne passioningFor Theseus perjury and unjust flight, that the pageant in the time of Elizabeth hadbegun to assume something of the classicalcharacter of the masque. But it had certainlynot become the gorgeous entertainment whichJonson has so glowingly described, as of powerto surprise with delight, and steal away thespectators from themselves. The pageant inwhich Julia acted at Pentecost was probablysuch as Shakspere had seen in some statelybaronial hall of his rich county.. COSTUME. In the folio of 1623, there are no indicationsof the localities of the several Scenes. Thenotices, such as An open place in Verona, The Garden of Julias House, A Koom in theDukes Palace, A Forest near Mantua, are ad-ditions that have been usefully made, from timeto time. The text, either specially or by al-lusion, of course furnishes the authority forthese directions. Cesare Vecellio, the brother of Titian, in hiscurious work, Habiti Antiche e Moderni ditutto il mondo, completed in 1589, presents uswith the general costume of the noblemen and gentlemen of Italy, which has been made fa-miliar to us by the well-known portraits of thecontemporary monarchs, Francis I. and our ownHenry VIII. He tells us that they wore a sortof diadem surmounted by a turban-like cap ofgold tissue, or embroidered silk, a plaited shirtlow in the neck with a small band or ruff, acoat or cassock of the German fashion, short inthe waist

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