. The Civil engineer and architect's journal, scientific and railway gazette. Architecture; Civil engineering; Science. Fig. 2.—Nasmyth's Direct Action Steam Hammer. as to cost, in some cases, nearly as much as the whole metallic part of the apparatus. With respect to the action of such a forge hammer, as seen in Fig. 1, it will be found that one grand defect in principle exists, namely, that when engaged in hammering a large piece of work, as that seen in the sketch, by reason of the work occupying the greater part of the clear space between the anvil face and that of the ham- mer, we have th

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. The Civil engineer and architect's journal, scientific and railway gazette. Architecture; Civil engineering; Science. Fig. 2.—Nasmyth's Direct Action Steam Hammer. as to cost, in some cases, nearly as much as the whole metallic part of the apparatus. With respect to the action of such a forge hammer, as seen in Fig. 1, it will be found that one grand defect in principle exists, namely, that when engaged in hammering a large piece of work, as that seen in the sketch, by reason of the work occupying the greater part of the clear space between the anvil face and that of the ham- mer, we have th Stock Photo
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https://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1 https://www.alamy.com/the-civil-engineer-and-architects-journal-scientific-and-railway-gazette-architecture-civil-engineering-science-fig-2nasmyths-direct-action-steam-hammer-as-to-cost-in-some-cases-nearly-as-much-as-the-whole-metallic-part-of-the-apparatus-with-respect-to-the-action-of-such-a-forge-hammer-as-seen-in-fig-1-it-will-be-found-that-one-grand-defect-in-principle-exists-namely-that-when-engaged-in-hammering-a-large-piece-of-work-as-that-seen-in-the-sketch-by-reason-of-the-work-occupying-the-greater-part-of-the-clear-space-between-the-anvil-face-and-that-of-the-ham-mer-we-have-th-image232777741.html
. The Civil engineer and architect's journal, scientific and railway gazette. Architecture; Civil engineering; Science. Fig. 2.—Nasmyth's Direct Action Steam Hammer. as to cost, in some cases, nearly as much as the whole metallic part of the apparatus. With respect to the action of such a forge hammer, as seen in Fig. 1, it will be found that one grand defect in principle exists, namely, that when engaged in hammering a large piece of work, as that seen in the sketch, by reason of the work occupying the greater part of the clear space between the anvil face and that of the ham- mer, we have th
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Image ID: REKXAN
. The Civil engineer and architect's journal, scientific and railway gazette. Architecture; Civil engineering; Science. Fig. 2.—Nasmyth's Direct Action Steam Hammer. as to cost, in some cases, nearly as much as the whole metallic part of the apparatus. With respect to the action of such a forge hammer, as seen in Fig. 1, it will be found that one grand defect in principle exists, namely, that when engaged in hammering a large piece of work, as that seen in the sketch, by reason of the work occupying the greater part of the clear space between the anvil face and that of the ham- mer, we have thereby a slight blow when we are doing a large piece of work, and a heavy blow when we are hammering a small or thinner piece of work, which is just the very reverse of what we could de- sire. And in the execution of large work this is found to be a most serious evil, in as much as, from the nature of the case, we would wish to have the most powerful and energetic blows that it is possible to command. The result of this is, that neither is the mass rendered so sound as we could desire, nor is it brought to its required form except by repeated heatings, at the very great sacrifice of time and iron, in so far as, ere the limited blows of the hammer have produced the re- quired change of form, the welding heat has gone off, and all blows after this tend rather to loosen than compact or solidify the mass. Again, we have, another very serious evil, namely, the very confined limits of the space between the hammer face at its highest, and that Fig. 5.—Self-acting. of the face of the anvil, which renders it quite incapable of admitting or operating upon a mass of any great breadth or height; and besides having the machinery of the hammer quite in the way, in many cases we have also this other disadvantage, namely, that except for one thickness of work, the hammer face and anvil are not parallel, as will be evident on referring to the sketch, and considering that the face of-the hamm

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