. The chain of life in geological time [microform] : a sketch of the origin and succession of animals and plants. Paleontology; Paleobotany; Paléontologie; Paléobotanique. Fig. 39rt.—Fenestella LyelU {Da.vison). A Carb:.niferous Bryozoan. corals of the present day. Fig. 40 represents a form found at the base of the Siluro-Cambrian, and Fig. 41 shows forms characteristic of the Carboniferous Lime- stone. If we turn now to the sea-mosses (Bryozoa), we have a group of minute polyp-like animals inhabiting cells not unlike those of the Hy droids, and which form plant-like aggregates. But the animal

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. The chain of life in geological time [microform] : a sketch of the origin and succession of animals and plants. Paleontology; Paleobotany; Paléontologie; Paléobotanique. Fig. 39rt.—Fenestella LyelU {Da.vison). A Carb:.niferous Bryozoan. corals of the present day. Fig. 40 represents a form found at the base of the Siluro-Cambrian, and Fig. 41 shows forms characteristic of the Carboniferous Lime- stone. If we turn now to the sea-mosses (Bryozoa), we have a group of minute polyp-like animals inhabiting cells not unlike those of the Hy droids, and which form plant-like aggregates. But the animal
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Image ID: RJ6ANE
. The chain of life in geological time [microform] : a sketch of the origin and succession of animals and plants. Paleontology; Paleobotany; Paléontologie; Paléobotanique. Fig. 39rt.—Fenestella LyelU {Da.vison). A Carb:.niferous Bryozoan. corals of the present day. Fig. 40 represents a form found at the base of the Siluro-Cambrian, and Fig. 41 shows forms characteristic of the Carboniferous Lime- stone. If we turn now to the sea-mosses (Bryozoa), we have a group of minute polyp-like animals inhabiting cells not unlike those of the Hy droids, and which form plant-like aggregates. But the animals themselves are so different in structure that they are considered to be nearer allies of the bivalve shell-fishes than of the Corals. They are, in short, so different, that the most ardent evolutionist would scarcely hold a community of origin between them and such creatures as the Graptolites and Millepores, though an ordinary observer might readily confound the one with the other. These animals appear at the beginning of the Siluro-Cambrian, and such forms as that represented in Fig. 39, very closely allied to some now living, are large consti- tuents of some of the limestones of that period. Other forms,. Fig. 40. — Chaetetes fibrosa. A tabulate coral with micro- scopic cells. Ljwer bilurian.. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Dawson, J. W. (John William), Sir, 1820-1899. London : Religious Tract Society

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