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. The centennial history of Kutztown, Pennsylvania : celebrating the centennial of the incorporation of the borough, 1815-1915. to theWest were the Leni Lenape, meaning, realmen or true men, commonly called Dela-ware Indians. According to the Hand-book of American Indians, they were aconfederacy of three clans and were fore-most of the Algonquin tribes, occupyingEastern Pennsylvania, Southeastern NewYork, and all of New Jersey and Dela-ware. In remote times they were recognizedas Grand Father, by neighboring tribes,until 1720 when the Iroquois or Six Na-tions, through trickery assumed dominion

. The centennial history of Kutztown, Pennsylvania : celebrating the centennial of the incorporation of the borough, 1815-1915. to theWest were the Leni Lenape, meaning, realmen or true men, commonly called Dela-ware Indians. According to the Hand-book of American Indians, they were aconfederacy of three clans and were fore-most of the Algonquin tribes, occupyingEastern Pennsylvania, Southeastern NewYork, and all of New Jersey and Dela-ware. In remote times they were recognizedas Grand Father, by neighboring tribes,until 1720 when the Iroquois or Six Na-tions, through trickery assumed dominion Stock Photo
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. The centennial history of Kutztown, Pennsylvania : celebrating the centennial of the incorporation of the borough, 1815-1915. to theWest were the Leni Lenape, meaning, realmen or true men, commonly called Dela-ware Indians. According to the Hand-book of American Indians, they were aconfederacy of three clans and were fore-most of the Algonquin tribes, occupyingEastern Pennsylvania, Southeastern NewYork, and all of New Jersey and Dela-ware. In remote times they were recognizedas Grand Father, by neighboring tribes,until 1720 when the Iroquois or Six Na-tions, through trickery assumed dominionover them; made women of them asthey called it, forbidding them to makewar or sell land. According to Morgan they were com-posed of three principal tribes, called Un- amis or turtle, Unalachtigo or turkey, andMunsee, or Minsi, the wolf. According toBrinton they were named by their totemicemblems and geographic division, Took-seat (round paw wolf), which had twelvesub=tribes ; Poke Hooungo, (crawling tur-tle,) with ten sub-tribes; and Pullaook,(non-chewing turkey,) with twelve sub-tribes. Rutenber states that the Gachwech-. nagechgo or Lehigh Indians were probablyof the Unami tribe and it may be inferredthat they lived along the Delaware riverfrom the forks, (Lehigh and Delawarerivers, at Baston,) south beyond Philadel-ohia. The Wolf tribe is attributed to thehead waters of the Delaware and south asfar as the Lehigh river, but this authordoes not state how far west. It is fair,however, to assume that the Wolf tribeinhabited this vicinity and west beyond theSchuylkill river. According to Morgan the names of thesub-tribes of the Wolf clan were as fol-lows : Maan^reet, big feet; Weesowhetko,