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. The castellated and domestic architecture of Scotland, from the twelfth to the eighteenth century. maller of these, which is only 6 feet3 inches high, and the adjoining passage, have each a slit commanding SECOND PERIOD — 140 — CESSFORD CASTLE the doorway; the larger chamber seems to have been the guardroom,being near the entrance door and also close to the dungeon. The floor ofthe latter (now choked with ruins) was probably 6 or 7 feet lower thanthe adjoining floors, and its arched roof, now fallen, was about 3 feetabove the floor of the guardroom. The dungeon was entered by a hatch-way in

. The castellated and domestic architecture of Scotland, from the twelfth to the eighteenth century. maller of these, which is only 6 feet3 inches high, and the adjoining passage, have each a slit commanding SECOND PERIOD — 140 — CESSFORD CASTLE the doorway; the larger chamber seems to have been the guardroom,being near the entrance door and also close to the dungeon. The floor ofthe latter (now choked with ruins) was probably 6 or 7 feet lower thanthe adjoining floors, and its arched roof, now fallen, was about 3 feetabove the floor of the guardroom. The dungeon was entered by a hatch-way in Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2AFJG6G

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7.2 MB (266.9 KB Compressed download)

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2095 x 1193 px | 35.5 x 20.2 cm | 14 x 8 inches | 150dpi

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. The castellated and domestic architecture of Scotland, from the twelfth to the eighteenth century. maller of these, which is only 6 feet3 inches high, and the adjoining passage, have each a slit commanding SECOND PERIOD — 140 — CESSFORD CASTLE the doorway; the larger chamber seems to have been the guardroom,being near the entrance door and also close to the dungeon. The floor ofthe latter (now choked with ruins) was probably 6 or 7 feet lower thanthe adjoining floors, and its arched roof, now fallen, was about 3 feetabove the floor of the guardroom. The dungeon was entered by a hatch-way in the vault. A door, up a few steps of the circular staircase, leadsto the small chamber which contained the hatch. Another door from thisstaircase leads into the upper floor of the lower vault in the main building.These doors are shown by white lines on the Ground Floor Plan. The upper or principal entrance to the castle is at the level, or nearlyso, of the hall floor (Fig. 86) in the re-entering angle, but it is in the wallof the wing, not in that of the main structure, like the ground floor. PLAN OF FIRST FLOOR SE CTION Fig. 8t5.—Cessford Castle. Plan and Section. entrance. It is about 15 feet above the ground, and is checked for twodoors, one opening outwards and the other inwards, the latter beingsecured with a sliding-bar. This entrance was of course reached by amoveable ladder, and in connection with this there will be observed onthe face of the east wall and over the lower entrance, nearly at the levelof the door-sill, a projecting ledge, which was probably a support for awooden platform erected here in connection with the defence of thisentrance. From the upper doorway an arched passage leads to the stair,off which and up a few steps is the door to the kitchen, which occupiesthe wing on this floor. A few steps further up conduct to the door ofthe hall in the main part of the building. The hall measures 39 feet6 inches by 22 feet, and is well lighted by four windows

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