The canadian magazine of politics, science, art and literature, November 1910-April 1911 . care- 234 fully as you or I would pick up amatch. Two of these gantries, eachserving a couple of ships on adjacentslips, tower high above us, silentlyperforming the work of 200 men, amidthe discordant din of the beating ofhammers. With them a load of tenor even twenty tons is mere childsplay, just as it is to the floating cranewhich can swing its load of 200 tonseasily and silently into position. Meanwliile, as our steamer slowsdown to half-speed, we have agood opportunity to gaze around us.and the first

The canadian magazine of politics, science, art and literature, November 1910-April 1911 . care- 234 fully as you or I would pick up amatch. Two of these gantries, eachserving a couple of ships on adjacentslips, tower high above us, silentlyperforming the work of 200 men, amidthe discordant din of the beating ofhammers. With them a load of tenor even twenty tons is mere childsplay, just as it is to the floating cranewhich can swing its load of 200 tonseasily and silently into position. Meanwliile, as our steamer slowsdown to half-speed, we have agood opportunity to gaze around us.and the first Stock Photo
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Contributor:

The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2AX4015

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7.1 MB (371.8 KB Compressed download)

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1911 x 1307 px | 32.4 x 22.1 cm | 12.7 x 8.7 inches | 150dpi

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The canadian magazine of politics, science, art and literature, November 1910-April 1911 . care- 234 fully as you or I would pick up amatch. Two of these gantries, eachserving a couple of ships on adjacentslips, tower high above us, silentlyperforming the work of 200 men, amidthe discordant din of the beating ofhammers. With them a load of tenor even twenty tons is mere childsplay, just as it is to the floating cranewhich can swing its load of 200 tonseasily and silently into position. Meanwliile, as our steamer slowsdown to half-speed, we have agood opportunity to gaze around us.and the first thing to claim att-entionis the splendid demonstration of theprescience and energy of the harbourauthorities in the navigable channeland the encouragement given to ship-building. It seems like going backt<:< antediluvian days almost to re-call how in March. 1791, a shipbuildernamed William Ritchie came overfrom Scotland with ten men and aquantity of shipbuilding apparatusand materials to establish the firstshipyard. William Eitchie was en-terprising for his period, and the good. TilK CITY HALL. BELFAST. IT COST MOKE THAN TWO .MILLION UGLLAltS homely folk of those days were wontto keep royal holiday on such occa-sions as when he launched a ship of^00 tons burthen. He persevereduntil in October, 1838, there left theslips in his works a passenger steam-er. This ship, the Aurora, was 170feet long, of 453 tons register and 750tons burthen, developing 250 horee-power. Such was the inception ofthe shipbuilding industry. Othertimes, other methods. To-day in Bel-fast it is the habit to speak of steam-ers as being such a fraction of a milein length, and it would be no exag-geration to state that a steamer suchas the Aurora could be very easilystowed between decks on a modernliner. Belfast made the Lagan, andthe Lagan made Belfast. There ina sentence is a creed synonymouswith the citys motto, Pro tanioquid retrihiiariiuft: which might be 23, 5 liberally interpreted in the line of th

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