. The Canadian field-naturalist. January, 1935] The Canadian Field-Nat ihalist 11 The description on this drawing, No. 52 [see page 10] is as follows: From aa to a, a gristly substance circular that a woodcock and snipe has capable of extension and which at aa enters his bill—it seems a feeler. It is interesting to notice that the ear in this drawing is wrongly sketched, at the back, instead of in front of, the eye, where it should be, as discovered and pointed out by Chas. Whymper so many years later, in 1907. The "feeler" or "feelers" are the cornua of the hyoid.. The des

- Image ID: RG1DM9
. The Canadian field-naturalist. January, 1935] The Canadian Field-Nat ihalist 11 The description on this drawing, No. 52 [see page 10] is as follows: From aa to a, a gristly substance circular that a woodcock and snipe has capable of extension and which at aa enters his bill—it seems a feeler. It is interesting to notice that the ear in this drawing is wrongly sketched, at the back, instead of in front of, the eye, where it should be, as discovered and pointed out by Chas. Whymper so many years later, in 1907. The "feeler" or "feelers" are the cornua of the hyoid.. The des
Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RG1DM9
. The Canadian field-naturalist. January, 1935] The Canadian Field-Nat ihalist 11 The description on this drawing, No. 52 [see page 10] is as follows: From aa to a, a gristly substance circular that a woodcock and snipe has capable of extension and which at aa enters his bill—it seems a feeler. It is interesting to notice that the ear in this drawing is wrongly sketched, at the back, instead of in front of, the eye, where it should be, as discovered and pointed out by Chas. Whymper so many years later, in 1907. The "feeler" or "feelers" are the cornua of the hyoid.. The description on this drawing, No. 112, is as follows: Optic nerve oblong; Eye of woodcock; form The present writer has referred to Dr. Casey Wood's The Fundus oculi of Birds, 1917. and finda that although there is no drawing of the eye of a Woodcock the optic nerve and pecten of the eye of the Jay there portrayed corresponds exactly with that of the Woodcock, as stated and drawn by Cumberland. A some- what long gap now ensues in the history of the Woodcock; in fact, until the year 1842, when Loche'\ in his explorations in Algeria, has some- thing to say on the structure of the bird's bill, although, incidentally, his remarks did not appear in print until 1867, the work coming out in ten volumes (1848-67), that dealing with the birds, bearing the last named date. In part, he says:- of crystalline; Retina all dark brown; Optic nerve forms a long white streak; Crystalline of a Jay in other respects like the woodcock. 67. " Loehe Expl. Scient. de I'Algeris, 10 vols, folio, Paris, 1818- "Ihe structure of the bill is remarkable in that independently of the olfactory nerves which run throughout its length and re-unite at its tip, it is provided with a pair of muscles of which the mechanism is altogether peculiar. Thus, when the bird has plunged its beak into the mud oi into the earth to seek the worm or msect it desires, only the tip of this organ has the faculty of opening to

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