. The Canadian field-naturalist. 1996 MacDonald and Cook: Land Mammal Fauna of Southeast Alaska 591. Figure 4. Approximate extent of glaciers during the height of the Mid-Wisconsin Interstadial (60 000 - 30 000 yr B. P.) including the potential patterns of colonization of mammals along the ice-free corridor of the North Gulf Coast. Tundra-adapted mammals from southern Beringia may have included: Sorex jacksoni. Lepus otlms, Marmota camtschatica, M. broweri, Spennophilus parryii, Clethrionomys mtiliis, Microtiis oeconomus, M. miurus, Lemmus sp., Dicrostonyx sp., Canis lupus, Vulpes vulpes, Alop

. The Canadian field-naturalist. 1996 MacDonald and Cook: Land Mammal Fauna of Southeast Alaska 591. Figure 4. Approximate extent of glaciers during the height of the Mid-Wisconsin Interstadial (60 000 - 30 000 yr B. P.) including the potential patterns of colonization of mammals along the ice-free corridor of the North Gulf Coast. Tundra-adapted mammals from southern Beringia may have included: Sorex jacksoni. Lepus otlms, Marmota camtschatica, M. broweri, Spennophilus parryii, Clethrionomys mtiliis, Microtiis oeconomus, M. miurus, Lemmus sp., Dicrostonyx sp., Canis lupus, Vulpes vulpes, Alop Stock Photo
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. The Canadian field-naturalist. 1996 MacDonald and Cook: Land Mammal Fauna of Southeast Alaska 591. Figure 4. Approximate extent of glaciers during the height of the Mid-Wisconsin Interstadial (60 000 - 30 000 yr B. P.) including the potential patterns of colonization of mammals along the ice-free corridor of the North Gulf Coast. Tundra-adapted mammals from southern Beringia may have included: Sorex jacksoni. Lepus otlms, Marmota camtschatica, M. broweri, Spennophilus parryii, Clethrionomys mtiliis, Microtiis oeconomus, M. miurus, Lemmus sp., Dicrostonyx sp., Canis lupus, Vulpes vulpes, Alopex lagopus. Ursus arctos, U. maritimus, Mustela erminea, Gulo gulo, and Rangifer tamndus. Possible colonizers from the south include Sorex monticolus, Peromyscus sp., Microtus longicaudus, Ursus americanus, and Sorex palustris. Wisconsin glaciation. That these taxa possibly repre- sent paleoendemics was again raised (Klein 1965). He expanded the geographic scope of the discussion to include hypothesized refugia outside Southeast Alaska to the south on the Queen Charlotte Islands and northwest along the coast to Prince William Sound, Kenai Peninsula, and Kodiak Island (see also Heusser 1960, 1989; Molnia 1986; Mann 1986; O'Reilly et al. 1993). Klein (1965) also introduced the possibility that the continental shelf, which would have been exposed due to a lowered sea level during the last glacial advance, may have provided refugia. Not considered were the origins of relict populations prior to the last glacial. Along with an increasing appreciation of the dynamic nature of the distributions of mammals throughout the region, two initiatives have consider- able promise for clarifying the history of the region. One is the ability to recover phylogenetic relation- ships from molecular genetic data, providing a view of patterns of colonization and relationships among populations. Another is the recent discovery of hun- dreds of caves in the extensive karst of Prince of Wales and other

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