. The Cambridge natural history. Zoology. 456 NEUROPTERA. the under side of each mandible; in this groove the elongate and slender lobe that replaces the maxilla —-there being no maxillary palpi—• plays backwards and forwards, probably raking or dragging backwards to the buccal cavity at each movement a small quantity of the contents of the empaled victim. The small lower lip is peculiar, consisting in greater part of the two lobes that support the labial palpi. The pharynx is provided with a complex set of muscles, and, together with the buccal cavity, func- tions as an instrument of suction.

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. The Cambridge natural history. Zoology. 456 NEUROPTERA. the under side of each mandible; in this groove the elongate and slender lobe that replaces the maxilla —-there being no maxillary palpi—• plays backwards and forwards, probably raking or dragging backwards to the buccal cavity at each movement a small quantity of the contents of the empaled victim. The small lower lip is peculiar, consisting in greater part of the two lobes that support the labial palpi. The pharynx is provided with a complex set of muscles, and, together with the buccal cavity, func- tions as an instrument of suction. After the prey has been sucked dry the carcass is jerked away to a distance. When the ant-lion larva is full grown it forms a globular cocoon by fastening together grains of sand with fine silk from a slender spinneret placed at the posterior extremity of the body; in this cocoon it changes to an imago of very elongate form, and does not emerge until its meta- morphosis is quite completed, the skin of the pupa being, when the Insect emerges, left behind in the cocoon. The names by which the European ant-lion has been known are very numerous. It was called Formicajo and Formicario by Vallis- neri about two hundred years ago ; Keaumur called it Formica-leo, and this was adopted by some modern authors as a generic name for some other of the ant-lions. The French people call these Insects Fourmilions, of which ant-lion is our English equivalent. Tlie Latinised form of the term ant-lion, Formicaleo, is not now apphed to the common ant-lion as a generic term, it having been proposed to replace it by Mrjrmecoleon, Myrmeleo, or Alyrmeleon; this latter name at present seems likely to become generally adopted. There are several species of the genus found in Europe, and their trivial names have been confounded by various authors in such a way as to make it quite uncertain, without reference to a synonymic list, what species is intended by any particular writer. The species found in