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. The Bulletin of the North Carolina Department of Agriculture. Agriculture -- North Carolina. Fig. 32.'—Adult of the Variegated Cutworm, about natural size. (Photograph by the author.). Fig. 33.—Adult of the Greasy Cutworm, somewhat enlarged. (Photograph by the author.) Life-history and Habits.—The number of generations of Cutworms annually is very difficult to determine, as they overlap in a most con- fusing manner. There are certainly several each year in North Carolina. Part of the Cutworms evidently pass the winter in the pupse condition, but most Cutworms pass the winter as partially gro

. The Bulletin of the North Carolina Department of Agriculture. Agriculture -- North Carolina. Fig. 32.'—Adult of the Variegated Cutworm, about natural size. (Photograph by the author.). Fig. 33.—Adult of the Greasy Cutworm, somewhat enlarged. (Photograph by the author.) Life-history and Habits.—The number of generations of Cutworms annually is very difficult to determine, as they overlap in a most con- fusing manner. There are certainly several each year in North Carolina. Part of the Cutworms evidently pass the winter in the pupse condition, but most Cutworms pass the winter as partially gro Stock Photo
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Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo

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RGDFNW

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7.2 MB (254.6 KB Compressed download)

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2214 x 1129 px | 37.5 x 19.1 cm | 14.8 x 7.5 inches | 150dpi

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. The Bulletin of the North Carolina Department of Agriculture. Agriculture -- North Carolina. Fig. 32.'—Adult of the Variegated Cutworm, about natural size. (Photograph by the author.). Fig. 33.—Adult of the Greasy Cutworm, somewhat enlarged. (Photograph by the author.) Life-history and Habits.—The number of generations of Cutworms annually is very difficult to determine, as they overlap in a most con- fusing manner. There are certainly several each year in North Carolina. Part of the Cutworms evidently pass the winter in the pupse condition, but most Cutworms pass the winter as partially grown larva?. It is for this reason that they are so very destructive in the early spring. Hibernating over winter as they do, and being de- prived of their food by spring plowing, they are nearly starved when the tobacco is transplanted. They nearly always make up for their long starvation period by eating a large amount of food. Cutworms do not seem to prefer their food in a green state, hence they cut it off and let it wilt before they eat it. Frequently, however, they cut off in this way a great deal more than they are ever able to eat. The larvae pupate beneath the ground in little earthen cells. The moths mate soon after they issue and the female moths lay their eggs almost anywhere green vegetation is to be found. The eggs are placed on the leaves or stems of plants, on sticks or stones, lying on the ground—in fact, almost anywhere. The last generation of moths. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. North Carolina. Dept. of Agriculture. Raleigh : State Board of Agriculture

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