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. The Bulletin of the North Carolina Department of Agriculture. Agriculture -- North Carolina. 26 The Bulletin. Life History, etc.—The butterflies appear in very early spring and lay the yellow qggs on cabbage and related plants. The eggs hatch to small green ''worms" with velvety skin, which lie flat on the surface of the leaf. When grown the worm or caterpillar is about an inch long. Fig. 10.—Larva (or worm) of imported Cabbage Worm on cabbage leaf. Natural size. (Photo by Z. P. Metcalf.) and it then changes to the "chrysalis," or pupa, and from this the adult butterfly emerge

. The Bulletin of the North Carolina Department of Agriculture. Agriculture -- North Carolina. 26 The Bulletin. Life History, etc.—The butterflies appear in very early spring and lay the yellow qggs on cabbage and related plants. The eggs hatch to small green ''worms" with velvety skin, which lie flat on the surface of the leaf. When grown the worm or caterpillar is about an inch long. Fig. 10.—Larva (or worm) of imported Cabbage Worm on cabbage leaf. Natural size. (Photo by Z. P. Metcalf.) and it then changes to the "chrysalis," or pupa, and from this the adult butterfly emerge Stock Photo
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Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo

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RGD2XN

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7.1 MB (491.3 KB Compressed download)

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1823 x 1370 px | 30.9 x 23.2 cm | 12.2 x 9.1 inches | 150dpi

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. The Bulletin of the North Carolina Department of Agriculture. Agriculture -- North Carolina. 26 The Bulletin. Life History, etc.—The butterflies appear in very early spring and lay the yellow qggs on cabbage and related plants. The eggs hatch to small green ''worms" with velvety skin, which lie flat on the surface of the leaf. When grown the worm or caterpillar is about an inch long. Fig. 10.—Larva (or worm) of imported Cabbage Worm on cabbage leaf. Natural size. (Photo by Z. P. Metcalf.) and it then changes to the "chrysalis," or pupa, and from this the adult butterfly emerges after a few weeks. There are a number of broods each season, and the last brood of worms to reach maturity in the fall change to the chrysalis state and remain in that condition over winter, emerg- ing as butterflies in the spring. The chrysalis is not enclosed in a web or cocoon, but is entirely naked and is usually suspended from the under side of a leaf, stone, fence-rail or other object by a loop of thread around the body. The butterflies are very conspicuous everywhere all through the season—the small white butterflies seen flittering about cabbage are almost invariably of this species. There are several kinds of yellowish butterflies of about the same size that are sometimes seen in our gardens, but which have no connection with the cabbage worms. Natural Enemies.—The imported cabbage worm is destroyed by a. number of natural enemies. Here, again, the English sparrow comes in for some good work, as he has been observed to pick off worms from cabbage in gardens. Indeed, this bird seems to be fond of staying among the cabbage rows, and almost certainly it does really good work (especially in town and village gardens) in destroying cabbage lice, harlequin bugs and cabbage woruis. Dr. Chittenden says,* "The most important of its insect enemies are small parasites, all introductions from Europe. One of them was pur- posely imported from England in 1883 and durin

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