The British nation a history / by George MWrong . : I will ordermy army as I see fit; for your scoundrels of the House ofCommons you may do as you please. Walpole found it no easy task to manage the king. George II took himself very seriously. On the whole he was a man of honour, loyal to his friends, George u and ^autious, sober, and method^ical. But he was his queen, narrow-minded, and had the loose moralsof the privileged classes of his time. Frederick William,King of Prussia, called George a comedian, and this(|u;ility appears in his everlasting posing and bluster. Snappings and snubbings

The British nation a history / by George MWrong . : I will ordermy army as I see fit; for your scoundrels of the House ofCommons you may do as you please. Walpole found it no easy task to manage the king. George II took himself very seriously. On the whole he was a man of honour, loyal to his friends, George u and ^autious, sober, and method^ical. But he was his queen, narrow-minded, and had the loose moralsof the privileged classes of his time. Frederick William,King of Prussia, called George a comedian, and this(|u;ility appears in his everlasting posing and bluster. Snappings and snubbings Stock Photo
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The British nation a history / by George MWrong . : I will ordermy army as I see fit; for your scoundrels of the House ofCommons you may do as you please. Walpole found it no easy task to manage the king. George II took himself very seriously. On the whole he was a man of honour, loyal to his friends, George u and ^autious, sober, and method^ical. But he was his queen, narrow-minded, and had the loose moralsof the privileged classes of his time. Frederick William,King of Prussia, called George a comedian, and this(|u;ility appears in his everlasting posing and bluster. Snappings and snubbings were the staple of his talkwith Caroline, his remarkable queen; he would call hera fool to her face, and denounce her friends as scoundrels,puppies, or iuibecilos; yet he spent seven or eight hoursdaily in her society, wrote her interminable letters whenhe was away, and was heart-Viroken when she died in 1737.She never appeared to differ froui him. George wouldsneer at liis predecessors wlio had been ruled by wives or THE REIGN OF GEORGE II 447. Caroline of Axspach, Qveex ofGeorge II (1682-1737). favourites, and ask with absurd complacency who it wasthat governed him. Most men understood very well thatit was Caroline of Anspach;when Walpole persuaded her,he had really persuaded theking. She was a shrewd, able,and really modest woman,though Walpole jested brutal-ly with her about Georgesconduct, and decent societywould not to-day tolerate thelanguage of either of them. During eighty years of civilwar, revolution, and faction,England had rarely seen stablegovernment, and it was now astatesmans task to evolve aworkable system. Walpole did it. He durst do right, his son said of him, but hedurst do wrong, too; he was not of the heroic typeWalpoles ready to perish for an ideal. The chief fea- characterand tures of his policy Were to let alone trouble-pohcy of peace, g^^^g igg^^es, such as those concerned with re-ligion ; to attempt no great changes; to keep out of war;and ^ promote t