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. The Boston Cooking School magazine of culinary science and domestic economics . A Milk Boy. Milk Cans at a Country Station Some beef cattle are raised in Cuba,though to less extent than formerly,and numbers of large, lean, black pigs,apparently of the razor-back variety,as well as many goats. No sheep wereseen, but goats flesh is very often,served as mutton. Poultry and eggsseemed abundant. Quantities of fresh fish, mollusks,and other invertebrates are eaten. Inaddition to numerous varieties of fish,oysters, large and small shrimps, craw-fish (called lobster at the hotels) andcrabs, squid wa

. The Boston Cooking School magazine of culinary science and domestic economics . A Milk Boy. Milk Cans at a Country Station Some beef cattle are raised in Cuba,though to less extent than formerly,and numbers of large, lean, black pigs,apparently of the razor-back variety,as well as many goats. No sheep wereseen, but goats flesh is very often,served as mutton. Poultry and eggsseemed abundant. Quantities of fresh fish, mollusks,and other invertebrates are eaten. Inaddition to numerous varieties of fish,oysters, large and small shrimps, craw-fish (called lobster at the hotels) andcrabs, squid wa Stock Photo
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Reading Room 2020 / Alamy Stock Photo

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2CDY8RP

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7.1 MB (0.6 MB Compressed download)

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1809 x 1381 px | 30.6 x 23.4 cm | 12.1 x 9.2 inches | 150dpi

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. The Boston Cooking School magazine of culinary science and domestic economics . A Milk Boy. Milk Cans at a Country Station Some beef cattle are raised in Cuba,though to less extent than formerly,and numbers of large, lean, black pigs,apparently of the razor-back variety,as well as many goats. No sheep wereseen, but goats flesh is very often,served as mutton. Poultry and eggsseemed abundant. Quantities of fresh fish, mollusks,and other invertebrates are eaten. Inaddition to numerous varieties of fish,oysters, large and small shrimps, craw-fish (called lobster at the hotels) andcrabs, squid was noticed, and seemedquite abundant. The tentacles arecut in sections, and, when fried, arequite palatable, the flesh being whitewith a purplish-pink tinge, and theflavor not unlike scallop. Indeed, allthe fish and the shrimps and the craw-fish were most excellent. The nativeCuban oysters, which are of moderatesize, were not Tery satisfactory. Someoysters are imported from the UnitedStates. Both goats and cows milk is usedin Cuba. The animals are sometimesdriven through the s