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. The book of the garden. Gardening. BRASSICACEOUS PLANTS.—THE CABBAGE. 83 planted like any other cutting—produ- cing, in due time, plants fit for use, and cuttings for further propagating supplies. Amateurs might in this way keep up a succession of stock without the trouble of sowing seed. The great advantage, how- ever, is in keeping the stock uncontami- nated. Sowing and planting.—The time of sow- ing for a principal crop, to come into use the May following, is by long experience fixed by the London market-gardeners to be from the 25th of August to the 1st of September. A fortnight earlier

. The book of the garden. Gardening. BRASSICACEOUS PLANTS.—THE CABBAGE. 83 planted like any other cutting—produ- cing, in due time, plants fit for use, and cuttings for further propagating supplies. Amateurs might in this way keep up a succession of stock without the trouble of sowing seed. The great advantage, how- ever, is in keeping the stock uncontami- nated. Sowing and planting.—The time of sow- ing for a principal crop, to come into use the May following, is by long experience fixed by the London market-gardeners to be from the 25th of August to the 1st of September. A fortnight earlier  Stock Photo
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Contributor:

Central Historic Books / Alamy Stock Photo

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PG3FA0

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7.2 MB (168.2 KB Compressed download)

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Dimensions:

1895 x 1319 px | 32.1 x 22.3 cm | 12.6 x 8.8 inches | 150dpi

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. The book of the garden. Gardening. BRASSICACEOUS PLANTS.—THE CABBAGE. 83 planted like any other cutting—produ- cing, in due time, plants fit for use, and cuttings for further propagating supplies. Amateurs might in this way keep up a succession of stock without the trouble of sowing seed. The great advantage, how- ever, is in keeping the stock uncontami- nated. Sowing and planting.—The time of sow- ing for a principal crop, to come into use the May following, is by long experience fixed by the London market-gardeners to be from the 25th of August to the 1st of September. A fortnight earlier is expe- dient north of Newcastle, unless in very favourable situations, when the 25th of August may be taken. Much of the dan- ger attending too early sowing is in the plants running to seed in spring without hearting. No doubt there is something in this; but seed of a good variety, and at least a year old, is not hable, under proper management, to do this. It is, however, well to make two sowings in all suspi- cious cases—the one during the first week, and the second during the last week in the month. Plants from this sowing should be planted out for good by the middle or latter end of October, the plants having been previously re- moved from the seed-bed as soon as they are fit to handle, and being transplanted into a nursery-bed in what is called the pricking-out manner. The largest of these should be planted first, and the smaller afterwards, which may extend the season of their final planting to the first or second week in November. This is to be considered as affording a general spring or early summer full crop. Towards the end of February or beginning of March, sow, to secure plants fit for planting out in May, June, and July, generally as the ground is cleared of early crops of pease ; this will give a supply fit for use during the latter part of summer and autumn. These are the two general sowings. For particular purposes, and in peculiar situa- tions, a sowin

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