. The book of bugs. 130 The Book of Bugs.. Fig. 2Q. Tinea biselliella^ the webbing, or Southern clothes- moth; adult moth, larva cocoon, and empty pupa-skin, moth of the Southern States, has two broods a year. Its larva constructs no case or frock for itself, but spins a silk-embowered path for itself wherever it goes. It is of an uniform ocher tint, and it has been reared in England successfully on a dainty diet of cobwebs. Its particular joy is to find out where there is a collection of the most expen- sive insects, and then to de- vour them utterly, thus satis- fying its cannibalistic appe-

- Image ID: RHD9Y4
. The book of bugs. 130 The Book of Bugs.. Fig. 2Q. Tinea biselliella^ the webbing, or Southern clothes- moth; adult moth, larva cocoon, and empty pupa-skin, moth of the Southern States, has two broods a year. Its larva constructs no case or frock for itself, but spins a silk-embowered path for itself wherever it goes. It is of an uniform ocher tint, and it has been reared in England successfully on a dainty diet of cobwebs. Its particular joy is to find out where there is a collection of the most expen- sive insects, and then to de- vour them utterly, thus satis- fying its cannibalistic appe-
Library Book Collection / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RHD9Y4
. The book of bugs. 130 The Book of Bugs.. Fig. 2Q. Tinea biselliella^ the webbing, or Southern clothes- moth; adult moth, larva cocoon, and empty pupa-skin, moth of the Southern States, has two broods a year. Its larva constructs no case or frock for itself, but spins a silk-embowered path for itself wherever it goes. It is of an uniform ocher tint, and it has been reared in England successfully on a dainty diet of cobwebs. Its particular joy is to find out where there is a collection of the most expen- sive insects, and then to de- vour them utterly, thus satis- fying its cannibalistic appe- tite. It is evident that, when all the living creatures passed before Adam to see what names he would give them, the young of these moths could not have been clothes-eaters, for the very simple reason that there were no clothes to eat. Our first parents had not even got as far as the fig-leaf costume. What did the clothes-moth originally do for a living? In the world every employment is greatly overcrowded, and a man has to turn his hand to what he can. When an animal dies, it is easy for Dame Nature to get rid of the flesh. There are no end of creatures only too glad to get the contract to take it away, even if the bacteria and carrion-flies \vere left out of the calculation. But the fur and the feathers, how about them? Dame Nature one day hung out a sign: HELP WANTED. EXPERIENCED INSECT TO REMOVE FUR. The original clothes-moth undertook the task. When man appeared on the scene, Tinea pellionella found the. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Sutherland, Harvey. New York ; London : Street & Smith