. The Biological bulletin. Biology; Zoology; Biology; Marine Biology. Figure 1. Normal gill current of lobster (Htnnarus americanus) vis- ualized with dye shows typical, turbulent jet plume. derstand its sensory bandwidths. To explore the world of underwater odor signals, we designed a number of arti- ficial sensors that could resolve the dynamics of odor concentration with the same spatio-temporal bandwidth as the lobster, Homarus amerieanus. an animal that has guided most of our work on marine chemical signals. The essential anatomical unit for lobster chemotaxis is the aesthetasc sensillum

- Image ID: RHMBKE
. The Biological bulletin. Biology; Zoology; Biology; Marine Biology. Figure 1. Normal gill current of lobster (Htnnarus americanus) vis- ualized with dye shows typical, turbulent jet plume. derstand its sensory bandwidths. To explore the world of underwater odor signals, we designed a number of arti- ficial sensors that could resolve the dynamics of odor concentration with the same spatio-temporal bandwidth as the lobster, Homarus amerieanus. an animal that has guided most of our work on marine chemical signals. The essential anatomical unit for lobster chemotaxis is the aesthetasc sensillum
Library Book Collection / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RHMBKE
. The Biological bulletin. Biology; Zoology; Biology; Marine Biology. Figure 1. Normal gill current of lobster (Htnnarus americanus) vis- ualized with dye shows typical, turbulent jet plume. derstand its sensory bandwidths. To explore the world of underwater odor signals, we designed a number of arti- ficial sensors that could resolve the dynamics of odor concentration with the same spatio-temporal bandwidth as the lobster, Homarus amerieanus. an animal that has guided most of our work on marine chemical signals. The essential anatomical unit for lobster chemotaxis is the aesthetasc sensillum of its lateral antennular flagel- lum (Devine and Atema, 1982) (Fig. 2). The final sensor we now use is a carbon-filled glass microelectrode (Ger- hardt el al. 1982) that matches the aesthetasc diameter of 30 urn; we pushed the temporal resolution of the elec- trochemical detection process up to 200 Hz (Moore el •III. Figure 2. Glass electrode odor sensor, here placed horizontally near the tips of olfactory (aesthetasc) sensilla (rows of slanted, transparent hairs) of the lobster's lateral antennular flagellum. The electrochemical sensor, size-scaled to one lobster aesthetasc sensillum for comparable spatial resolution, detects dopamine used as a tracer for odor. Temporal resolution of sensor up to 200 Hz; of lobster olfactory receptor cells about 5 Hz. -100-1 -50- Stationory Sensor Pairs (X=100. Y=-5, Z=9cm) E o a. o Q 0 50 100 Left Right 20 40 60 Time (s) 80 100 120 Figure 3. Typical peak structure of continuous odor (dopamine) concentration patterns measured with two stationary electrochemical sensors (30-nm tip diameter, 10-Hz sampling rate) spaced 3 cm apart at 9 cm above the ground similar to bilateral lobster antennules. The sensors are located 100 cm down-current 5 cm to the right of the center ( V-)a\is of the flume. Right side inverted for clarity. ul.. 1989), significantly exceeding the lobster's chemo- sensory flicker-fusion frequency of 5 Hz (Gomez el a/.. 1996).

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