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. The Big Blackfoot River restoration progress report for 2002 and 2003 . Fish populations; Fishes; Fishery management; Trout fisheries; Stream ecology; Blackfoot River (Mont. ). and Yellowstone cutthroat trout, overharvest and competition with introduced brook trout and brown trout (Likncs 1984; Allendorf and Leary 1988; Liknes and Graham 1988; Mclntyre and Rieman 1995; Shepard et al. 2003). In the Blackfoot Watershed, WSCT occupy -93% of historical range, compared with -39% of occupied historical range statewide. The Blackfoot River also supports one of the larger fluvial meta-populations of

. The Big Blackfoot River restoration progress report for 2002 and 2003 . Fish populations; Fishes; Fishery management; Trout fisheries; Stream ecology; Blackfoot River (Mont. ). and Yellowstone cutthroat trout, overharvest and competition with introduced brook trout and brown trout (Likncs 1984; Allendorf and Leary 1988; Liknes and Graham 1988; Mclntyre and Rieman 1995; Shepard et al. 2003). In the Blackfoot Watershed, WSCT occupy -93% of historical range, compared with -39% of occupied historical range statewide. The Blackfoot River also supports one of the larger fluvial meta-populations of Stock Photo
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Contributor:

Library Book Collection / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

RHT9TK

File size:

7.1 MB (253.2 KB Compressed download)

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Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

1952 x 1280 px | 33.1 x 21.7 cm | 13 x 8.5 inches | 150dpi

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This image is a public domain image, which means either that copyright has expired in the image or the copyright holder has waived their copyright. Alamy charges you a fee for access to the high resolution copy of the image.

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

. The Big Blackfoot River restoration progress report for 2002 and 2003 . Fish populations; Fishes; Fishery management; Trout fisheries; Stream ecology; Blackfoot River (Mont. ). and Yellowstone cutthroat trout, overharvest and competition with introduced brook trout and brown trout (Likncs 1984; Allendorf and Leary 1988; Liknes and Graham 1988; Mclntyre and Rieman 1995; Shepard et al. 2003). In the Blackfoot Watershed, WSCT occupy -93% of historical range, compared with -39% of occupied historical range statewide. The Blackfoot River also supports one of the larger fluvial meta-populations of genetically unaltered WSCT (upper drainage) in Montana, but at population abundance well below habitat capacity (Shepard et al. 2003). The Blackfoot River watershed (outside of the Clearwater Drainage) supports a nearly basin-wide distribution of WSCT with 86% (84 of 98) of surveyed fish-bearing tributaries containing WSCT (Pierce et al. 1997, 2002, 2001, Pierce and Schmetterling 1999, Peters 1990, Results Part IV). Streams lacking WSCT are either impau-ed headwater streams or degraded spring creeks. Outside of the Clearwater River drainage. WSCT stocks include migratory [fluvial) and non-migratory (resident) fish. Fluvial fish have a sympatric resident component. Both resident and fluvial WSCT rely on high quality tributary habitats for spavraing, rearing and over-wintering, and both often inhabit the same stream. Resident fish can also maintain populations in isolation, occupying less than one mile of perennial stream in some cases (Pierce et al. 2001), whereas access to the Blackfoot River is also necessary for fluvial fish (Results Part IV). Fluvial WSCT spend early life stages in smaller streams, migrate to rivers at age 2-3 where they mature and grow to much larger size than resident fish, before returning to natal tributaries at - age 5 to spawn (Behnke 1992). In Montana, only 8 - 20% of the historical range is occupied by genetically unaltered fish (Shepard et al. 2003

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