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. The Big Blackfoot River restoration progress report for 2002 and 2003 . Fish populations; Fishes; Fishery management; Trout fisheries; Stream ecology; Blackfoot River (Mont. ). Although bull trout are particularly sensitive to many threats, whirling disease appears to he less of a concern for bull trout than for other salmonids. Compared with WSCT, rainbow trout and brook trout, bull trout exhibit a greater physiological resistance to whirling disease (Vincent 2001). In 2002 as whirling disease infection rates continued to escalate, we expanded whirling disease monitoring to the bull trout s

. The Big Blackfoot River restoration progress report for 2002 and 2003 . Fish populations; Fishes; Fishery management; Trout fisheries; Stream ecology; Blackfoot River (Mont. ). Although bull trout are particularly sensitive to many threats, whirling disease appears to he less of a concern for bull trout than for other salmonids. Compared with WSCT, rainbow trout and brook trout, bull trout exhibit a greater physiological resistance to whirling disease (Vincent 2001). In 2002 as whirling disease infection rates continued to escalate, we expanded whirling disease monitoring to the bull trout s Stock Photo
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Library Book Collection / Alamy Stock Photo

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RHT9TW

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7.1 MB (232 KB Compressed download)

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2058 x 1214 px | 34.8 x 20.6 cm | 13.7 x 8.1 inches | 150dpi

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. The Big Blackfoot River restoration progress report for 2002 and 2003 . Fish populations; Fishes; Fishery management; Trout fisheries; Stream ecology; Blackfoot River (Mont. ). Although bull trout are particularly sensitive to many threats, whirling disease appears to he less of a concern for bull trout than for other salmonids. Compared with WSCT, rainbow trout and brook trout, bull trout exhibit a greater physiological resistance to whirling disease (Vincent 2001). In 2002 as whirling disease infection rates continued to escalate, we expanded whirling disease monitoring to the bull trout spawning or rearing areas of Cottonwood Creek, Monture Creek and the North Fork. Sentinel fish exposures indicate that whirling disease is not present at these locations, although the disease is present at moderate levels in lower reaches of these streams (Results Part IV). Based on fisheries management-related risk factors for bull trout recovery, we recently identified hull trout recovery - recreational conflict areas (Pierce et al. 2001). These conflict areas refer to biologically critical sites (key spawning, rearing and staging areas, important migration corridors and areas of thermal refugia) and overlap with recreational developments, increased angler pressure and illegal bull trout harvest problems (Figure 5). In 2003. FWP adopted artificial lure only gear restrictions for the mouths of the North Fork of the Blackfoot River and Monture Creek to reduce angling pressure and angling mortality on bull tout. Both locations (junctions of major spawning streams with the Blackfoot River) receive concentrated bull trout use and very high angling pressure (Appendix K). The confluence of the North Fork is also the site of a FWP Fishing Access Site (FAS), and the Monture Creek confluence is a high use access site, currently being considered for FAS purchase. Recreational conflict concerns for bull trout further relate to: 1) large increases in angling pressure in critical recovery a

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