The Battle of Cer(b) was fought between Austria-Hungary and Serbia in August 1914 during the early stages of the Serbian Campaign of WWI. The battle, part of the first Austro-Hungarian invasion of Serbia, began on the night of August 15 when elements of the Serbian 1st Combined Division encountered Austro-Hungarian outposts that had been established on the slopes of Cer Mountain earlier in the invasion. The clashes that followed escalated into a battle for control over several towns and villages near the mountain, especially Sabac. On August 19, the morale of the Austro-Hungarians collapsed an

- Image ID: JR31D9
The Battle of Cer(b) was fought between Austria-Hungary and Serbia in August 1914 during the early stages of the Serbian Campaign of WWI. The battle, part of the first Austro-Hungarian invasion of Serbia, began on the night of August 15 when elements of the Serbian 1st Combined Division encountered Austro-Hungarian outposts that had been established on the slopes of Cer Mountain earlier in the invasion. The clashes that followed escalated into a battle for control over several towns and villages near the mountain, especially Sabac. On August 19, the morale of the Austro-Hungarians collapsed an
Science History Images / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: JR31D9
The Battle of Cer(b) was fought between Austria-Hungary and Serbia in August 1914 during the early stages of the Serbian Campaign of WWI. The battle, part of the first Austro-Hungarian invasion of Serbia, began on the night of August 15 when elements of the Serbian 1st Combined Division encountered Austro-Hungarian outposts that had been established on the slopes of Cer Mountain earlier in the invasion. The clashes that followed escalated into a battle for control over several towns and villages near the mountain, especially Sabac. On August 19, the morale of the Austro-Hungarians collapsed and thousands of soldiers retreated back into Austria-Hungary, many of them drowning in the Drina River as they fled in panic. On August 24 the Serbs re-entered Sabac, marking the end of the battle. Serbian casualties were 3,000-5,000 killed and 15,000 wounded. Those of the Austro-Hungarians were significantly higher, with 6,000-10,000 soldiers killed, 30,000 wounded and 4,500 taken as prisoners of war. The Serb victory over the Austro-Hungarians marked the first Allied victory over the Central Powers in WWI.