Alamy logo

. The Badland formations of the Black Hills region. Geology; Geology, Stratigraphic; Vertebrates, Fossil. 110 The Badiland Formations of the Black Hills [Region. Fignre'i6—Restored skeleton of Agriochoerus latifrons. After Wort- man, 1896. able in that its toes were apparently armed with claws instead of hoofs and the first toe (the thumb) of the fore ipot seems to have been opposable. Aside from its foot structure the animal was much like the Oreodon. It was approximately three feet long not including the rather long tail. Mesoreodon is likewise remarkable in that the thyroid cartilage of the

. The Badland formations of the Black Hills region. Geology; Geology, Stratigraphic; Vertebrates, Fossil. 110 The Badiland Formations of the Black Hills [Region. Fignre'i6—Restored skeleton of Agriochoerus latifrons. After Wort- man, 1896. able in that its toes were apparently armed with claws instead of hoofs and the first toe (the thumb) of the fore ipot seems to have been opposable. Aside from its foot structure the animal was much like the Oreodon. It was approximately three feet long not including the rather long tail. Mesoreodon is likewise remarkable in that the thyroid cartilage of the Stock Photo
Preview

Image details

Contributor:

Library Book Collection / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

RJN94A

File size:

7.1 MB (273.1 KB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

2636 x 948 px | 22.3 x 8 cm | 8.8 x 3.2 inches | 300dpi

More information:

This image is a public domain image, which means either that copyright has expired in the image or the copyright holder has waived their copyright. Alamy charges you a fee for access to the high resolution copy of the image.

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

. The Badland formations of the Black Hills region. Geology; Geology, Stratigraphic; Vertebrates, Fossil. 110 The Badiland Formations of the Black Hills [Region. Fignre'i6—Restored skeleton of Agriochoerus latifrons. After Wort- man, 1896. able in that its toes were apparently armed with claws instead of hoofs and the first toe (the thumb) of the fore ipot seems to have been opposable. Aside from its foot structure the animal was much like the Oreodon. It was approximately three feet long not including the rather long tail. Mesoreodon is likewise remarkable in that the thyroid cartilage of the larynx was ossified much as in the howling monkey and according to Prof. Scott it must have had most unusual powers of voice. , Promerycoehoerus, a larger and heavier animal than those of the earlier genera, has been found in considerable numbers in northwestern Nebraska and eastern Wyoming. Plate 48 shows the restored skeleton of Promerycochoerus carrikeri. This skeleton is more than five and one-half feet long and evidently indicates a large bodied slow moving animal the habits of which as has been suggested were perhaps somewhat the •same as those of the hippopotamus. Peterson describes the animal briefly as having a massive head, a short, robust neck, •dorsal vertebrae provided with prominent spines, lumbar vertebrae heavy, thoracic cavity capacious, and the feet large. The Oreodons are found in the Lower and Middle Oligocene and are particularly common in what is known as the "lower nodular layer'' (red layer) of the Middle Oligocene fifteen or twenty feet above the Titanotherium beds. It is on account of the abundance of these fossils and their early discovery in the Middle Oligocene that this division of the badland formations was by Hayden given the name of Oreodon beds. Leidy tells us that as early as 1869 he had observed fossils of approximately five hundred individuals among the collections sent him for study. Few general badland collections fail to show

Save up to 30% with our image packs

Pre-pay for multiple images and download on demand.

View discounts