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. The Australian zoologist. Zoology; Zoology; Zoology. TILL YARD AND FRASER. 373 flourishing and widespread fauna as is evidenced by their broken distri- bution throughout the world. The wings are long, narrow, subfalcate and densely reticulated and, as in the Gomphidae, they are always hyaline and uncoloured; the ante- nodal complex is similar to this last family; the base of the hindwing is strongly angulated and excised; the discoidal cells are usually similar in the fore and hindwings, but in Phenes and Tachopteryx, that of the hindwing is smaller and more oblique; a subtrigone is present

. The Australian zoologist. Zoology; Zoology; Zoology. TILL YARD AND FRASER. 373 flourishing and widespread fauna as is evidenced by their broken distri- bution throughout the world. The wings are long, narrow, subfalcate and densely reticulated and, as in the Gomphidae, they are always hyaline and uncoloured; the ante- nodal complex is similar to this last family; the base of the hindwing is strongly angulated and excised; the discoidal cells are usually similar in the fore and hindwings, but in Phenes and Tachopteryx, that of the hindwing is smaller and more oblique; a subtrigone is present  Stock Photo
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Library Book Collection / Alamy Stock Photo

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RJP94H

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7.1 MB (430.2 KB Compressed download)

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1989 x 1256 px | 33.7 x 21.3 cm | 13.3 x 8.4 inches | 150dpi

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. The Australian zoologist. Zoology; Zoology; Zoology. TILL YARD AND FRASER. 373 flourishing and widespread fauna as is evidenced by their broken distri- bution throughout the world. The wings are long, narrow, subfalcate and densely reticulated and, as in the Gomphidae, they are always hyaline and uncoloured; the ante- nodal complex is similar to this last family; the base of the hindwing is strongly angulated and excised; the discoidal cells are usually similar in the fore and hindwings, but in Phenes and Tachopteryx, that of the hindwing is smaller and more oblique; a subtrigone is present in the forewing and is usually divided into 2 or more cells; the anal-loop is small and rudi- mentary, being usually open posteriorly and made up of not more than 3 to 5 cells; the pterostigma is of enormous length and extremely narrow and. Fig. 8.—Wings of Petaluridae (Uropetala), male. is often separated from its brace which lies some distance proximally, especially in Phenes. (This feature is not archaic as generally supposed, since the pterostigma is absent in the Protodonata and either short or very broad in the earliest known fossil Odonata.) The proximal position of the brace suggests that the pterostigma was much longer at one time than it is at present in these forms. The head is massive and the eyes widely separated as in the Gomphidae; the abdomen is elongate and cylindrical, with, in some genera, in the female, the end segments deflected dorsal- wards so that the zygopterous type of ovipositor comes to look directly posteriorwards in these. The anal appendages are highly specialized, the superiors more or less broadly foliate or triangular except in Phenes, and the inferior hastiform or elongate and hook-like. The larvae, which are best known from Dr. Tillyard's researches on the Australian forms, but also from the N. American Tachopteryx thoreyi, are quite the most interesting of the whole order Odonata, from their. Please note that these images are extracted fro

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