. The Australian Museum magazine. Natural history. 158 THE AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM MAGAZINE. A Food Hanger with Rat Disc from Fiji. By Thos. Steel, F.L.S. That the rat as a pest has been known to primitive man, as well as to his civi- lised brother, is shown by the food hanger depicted in the accompanying illustration. It is interesting to observe that the de- vice, a disc, employed to frustrate the predatory habits of this rodent, is similar At the feet is another block having four upwardly pointing blunt pegs. The object of this arrangement is to prevent the access of rats to baskets con- taining

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. The Australian Museum magazine. Natural history. 158 THE AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM MAGAZINE. A Food Hanger with Rat Disc from Fiji. By Thos. Steel, F.L.S. That the rat as a pest has been known to primitive man, as well as to his civi- lised brother, is shown by the food hanger depicted in the accompanying illustration. It is interesting to observe that the de- vice, a disc, employed to frustrate the predatory habits of this rodent, is similar At the feet is another block having four upwardly pointing blunt pegs. The object of this arrangement is to prevent the access of rats to baskets con- taining  Stock Photo
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. The Australian Museum magazine. Natural history. 158 THE AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM MAGAZINE. A Food Hanger with Rat Disc from Fiji. By Thos. Steel, F.L.S. That the rat as a pest has been known to primitive man, as well as to his civi- lised brother, is shown by the food hanger depicted in the accompanying illustration. It is interesting to observe that the de- vice, a disc, employed to frustrate the predatory habits of this rodent, is similar At the feet is another block having four upwardly pointing blunt pegs. The object of this arrangement is to prevent the access of rats to baskets con- taining
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. The Australian Museum magazine. Natural history. 158 THE AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM MAGAZINE. A Food Hanger with Rat Disc from Fiji. By Thos. Steel, F.L.S. That the rat as a pest has been known to primitive man, as well as to his civi- lised brother, is shown by the food hanger depicted in the accompanying illustration. It is interesting to observe that the de- vice, a disc, employed to frustrate the predatory habits of this rodent, is similar At the feet is another block having four upwardly pointing blunt pegs. The object of this arrangement is to prevent the access of rats to baskets con- taining food materials. The baskets hold- ing yams, taro, and other food are hung on the wooden pegs, the whole being sus-. Fijian Food Hanger. riioto—G. Glutton. to that used as a guard upon the lines connecting vessels to wharves or lighters which was introduced here only at the beginning of the present century, during the first outbreak of bubonic plague. This interesting object I obtained whilst residing in Fiji in 1885. It consists of a piece of wood roughly carved in human form. On top of the head there projects a peg which is perforated for the sus- pending cord. Beneath the hole is fitted loosely a disc of wood which projects for some distance all around over the figure. pended from the rafters. Any rats whicn climb down the suspending cord in their attempts to reach the food are unable to do so, for when they endeavour to get round the edge of the disc they imme- diately fall to the floor. An old Fijian, to whom I showed it, by signs indicated its use, adding tliat when the rats saw the image they were so startled as to cause them to fall off the disc. I have seen only two hangers carved in this way, they being usually quite plain.. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Australian Museum; Austra