. The Audubon annual bulletin. Birds; Birds. 32 THE AUDUBON BULLETIN Great Horned Owl On one of its early trips this spring, one of the bird classes of Car- thage College discovered this little Owl's home. It was high up in an oak tree. A week later the nest was almost destroyed. We do not know by what—or by whom. A third trip in that vicinity showed the nest built up again and the mother Owl sitting on four eggs. Two weeks later we visited it and found three babies. The fol- lowing week we brought back one to the college—taking the accompany- ing pictures of it. It was perhaps three weeks old

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. The Audubon annual bulletin. Birds; Birds. 32 THE AUDUBON BULLETIN Great Horned Owl On one of its early trips this spring, one of the bird classes of Car- thage College discovered this little Owl's home. It was high up in an oak tree. A week later the nest was almost destroyed. We do not know by what—or by whom. A third trip in that vicinity showed the nest built up again and the mother Owl sitting on four eggs. Two weeks later we visited it and found three babies. The fol- lowing week we brought back one to the college—taking the accompany- ing pictures of it. It was perhaps three weeks old
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Image ID: RJRPGK
. The Audubon annual bulletin. Birds; Birds. 32 THE AUDUBON BULLETIN Great Horned Owl On one of its early trips this spring, one of the bird classes of Car- thage College discovered this little Owl's home. It was high up in an oak tree. A week later the nest was almost destroyed. We do not know by what—or by whom. A third trip in that vicinity showed the nest built up again and the mother Owl sitting on four eggs. Two weeks later we visited it and found three babies. The fol- lowing week we brought back one to the college—taking the accompany- ing pictures of it. It was perhaps three weeks old. One of the girls car- ried it close to her with her muff as a shield and the little Owl was quite content. Its amusing way of looking 5 t about from one to another of us while having its picture taken kept us all laughing, but a piece of beefsteak was more to the satisfaction of the little Owl. Mrs. F. C. Gates.. Seed Planting for Birds A timely suggestion from Mr. Musselman is that those who wish an abundance of birds both in numbers and varieties should begin to prepare in the spring for the growing of feed for the next winter's restaurant. Most important for those who desire nuthatches and goldfinches will be the planting of the large sunflower. A dime's worth of seed properly planted will supply a large harvest of fine heads for next winter. Plant them near your tennis court wires so that when the heads are heavy you can help support them. Those wishing to attract tree sparrows and juncoes should plant a supply of large headed grass such as millet, and this should be cut when ripe and laid away until the winter days. Then let it be dropped at the base of your feed box tree with small particles of bread crumbs and ground suet. Broom corn and maize both are good to be cut and reserved for the winter seed feeding. Blue grass when ripe may be cut and laid away also. This makes a good scratching bed for the birds, supplying feed and when placed over packed snow acts as a c

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