The apostolic age; its life, doctrine, worship and polity . en of the epistle is that they should live up tothis high idea of religion. Let us be spiritual, letus be a perfect shrine for God (iv. 11). Barnabas expects the immediate advent of the final offence, Anti-Christs short hour beforeMessiahs manifestation in power, to inaugurate HisMillennial Sabbath. Nero is to return and humblethe three Flavian rulers. This expectation is based,partly on the feeling that the destruction of Jeru-salem was the beginning of the end, and partly onthe apparent fulfilment of Daniels prophecy (vii. 7 f.24) i

The apostolic age; its life, doctrine, worship and polity . en of the epistle is that they should live up tothis high idea of religion. Let us be spiritual, letus be a perfect shrine for God (iv. 11). Barnabas expects the immediate advent of the final offence, Anti-Christs short hour beforeMessiahs manifestation in power, to inaugurate HisMillennial Sabbath. Nero is to return and humblethe three Flavian rulers. This expectation is based,partly on the feeling that the destruction of Jeru-salem was the beginning of the end, and partly onthe apparent fulfilment of Daniels prophecy (vii. 7 f.24) i Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2AM4D7M

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7.1 MB (213.1 KB Compressed download)

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1428 x 1749 px | 24.2 x 29.6 cm | 9.5 x 11.7 inches | 150dpi

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The apostolic age; its life, doctrine, worship and polity . en of the epistle is that they should live up tothis high idea of religion. Let us be spiritual, letus be a perfect shrine for God (iv. 11). Barnabas expects the immediate advent of the final offence, Anti-Christs short hour beforeMessiahs manifestation in power, to inaugurate HisMillennial Sabbath. Nero is to return and humblethe three Flavian rulers. This expectation is based, partly on the feeling that the destruction of Jeru-salem was the beginning of the end, and partly onthe apparent fulfilment of Daniels prophecy (vii. 7 f.24) in the then peculiar threefold nature of theheadship of the Empire (the Beast). He does notseem to imply any existing persecution on the partof the State, though he regards suffering as the ap-pointed way to the Kingdom (vii. 11), meaningsocial persecution of various kinds. These pointswill meet us again in considering the Apocalypse.Meantime the last of them favors a date for Bar-nabas earlier than Johns vision, and within two orthree years after 70 A. D.. CHAPTER II. THE APOCALYPSE OF JOHN. POCALYPSES in every shape and formmay be described generally as Tracts forthe Times, and specially as Tracts forbad times. They are called forth bypressing needs. Their aim is a most prac-tical one, namely to succor distressed faith by cast-ing light upon the long wa}r when it leads throughdark valleys and over arid wastes, and when hopedeferred maketh sick the hearts that wait on God.They are also essentially Latter-Day writings.For, though they generally begin with a review ofGods past dealings with His people—cast in the formof visions vouchsafed to some Old Testament worthy—they always end with a forecast of the immediatefuture, viewed from the writers own age and stand-point, and often of the Final Consummation also.In fact they paint the penultimate acts in the divinedrama, the mystery of God. Thus they areeschatological in substance, while historical in form.The historical survey

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