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. The ancient stone implements, weapons, and ornaments, of Great Britain. e is not uncommon. The flaking on the convexsurface is very even and regular, and produces a slightly corrugatedsurface, with the low ridges following each other like ripple marks onsand. The edge is very minutely and evenly chipped, and is verysharp. The instrument may perhaps be regarded as a sort of knife. The form is well known in Ireland, but I do not remember to haveseen it in foreign collections. The beautifully wrought blade of flint, shown in Fig. 239, presents amore elongated variety of this form. It was found

. The ancient stone implements, weapons, and ornaments, of Great Britain. e is not uncommon. The flaking on the convexsurface is very even and regular, and produces a slightly corrugatedsurface, with the low ridges following each other like ripple marks onsand. The edge is very minutely and evenly chipped, and is verysharp. The instrument may perhaps be regarded as a sort of knife. The form is well known in Ireland, but I do not remember to haveseen it in foreign collections. The beautifully wrought blade of flint, shown in Fig. 239, presents amore elongated variety of this form. It was found Stock Photo
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Contributor:

Reading Room 2020 / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2CEYH5C

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7.2 MB (385.4 KB Compressed download)

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Dimensions:

941 x 2656 px | 8 x 22.5 cm | 3.1 x 8.9 inches | 300dpi

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. The ancient stone implements, weapons, and ornaments, of Great Britain. e is not uncommon. The flaking on the convexsurface is very even and regular, and produces a slightly corrugatedsurface, with the low ridges following each other like ripple marks onsand. The edge is very minutely and evenly chipped, and is verysharp. The instrument may perhaps be regarded as a sort of knife. The form is well known in Ireland, but I do not remember to haveseen it in foreign collections. The beautifully wrought blade of flint, shown in Fig. 239, presents amore elongated variety of this form. It was found by the Kev. W.Greenwell, F.S.A., with a burnt body, in a barrow at Castle Carrock,Cumberland. Another blade, curiously similar in workmanship andcharacter, was found by the same explorer in a barrow near Kudstone,Yorkshire, but in this case the body was unburnt. Another, withboth ends rounded and the edges more prorated, was found in abarrow at Robin Hood Butts, near Scarborough and is preserved in the * Eeliq. Aquit., p. 18. 296 TRIMMED FLAKES, KNIVES, ETC. [CHAP. XV.. Museum of that town. On the same card with it are arrow-heads—leaf-shaped, lozenge-shaped, and stemmed and barbed. Mr. Carrington* describes a flake flat on one face, and laboriouslychipped to a convex shape on the other, as foundwith burnt bones in a barrow at Musdin, Stafford-shire. A similar specimen in Ribden Low accom-panied a contracted interment. Mr. Bateman termsthem lance-heads. Mr. Greenwell has a leaf-shapedblade of this kind, flat on one face, found in BurntFen. The skilful character of the surface chipping onthese blades is perhaps better shown in Fig. 240,which is drawn full size from another specimen,also in Mr. Greenwells collection, which was foundin a cist with the remains of a burnt body, on FordCommon, Northumberland.! In some instruments, evidently belonging to thesame class, the secondary flaking does not extendover the whole of the convex surface of the blade,but some of the facets of th

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