The American Legion Weekly [Volume 4, No10 (March 10, 1922)] . llcommunities.—Bernard S. Stronks,Commander, Brewster Post, Brewster,Minn. Letting the People Choose AYEAR ago last July many of thecitizens and former service men ofSouth Pasadena did not know there wasa Legion post in existence in their city,and those that did were doubtful as tothe advisability of trying to keep thepost alive. Situated between two largecities where most of the members havetheir business and are wont to go fortheir entertainment, it looked ratherdiscouraging to the organizers of thepost every second and fourth Th

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The American Legion Weekly [Volume 4, No10 (March 10, 1922)] . llcommunities.—Bernard S. Stronks,Commander, Brewster Post, Brewster,Minn. Letting the People Choose AYEAR ago last July many of thecitizens and former service men ofSouth Pasadena did not know there wasa Legion post in existence in their city,and those that did were doubtful as tothe advisability of trying to keep thepost alive. Situated between two largecities where most of the members havetheir business and are wont to go fortheir entertainment, it looked ratherdiscouraging to the organizers of thepost every second and fourth Th
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The American Legion Weekly [Volume 4, No10 (March 10, 1922)] . llcommunities.—Bernard S. Stronks,Commander, Brewster Post, Brewster,Minn. Letting the People Choose AYEAR ago last July many of thecitizens and former service men ofSouth Pasadena did not know there wasa Legion post in existence in their city,and those that did were doubtful as tothe advisability of trying to keep thepost alive. Situated between two largecities where most of the members havetheir business and are wont to go fortheir entertainment, it looked ratherdiscouraging to the organizers of thepost every second and fourth Thursdayof the month. While in this state of blues, an op-timist, and I think it was our command-er, complained that we did not have a This week Legionnaires in New Hampshire, Massa-chusetts, Pennsylvania, Minnesota, Montana andCalifornia tell how their posts obtained their ownquarters. The largest town on the list of six hasless than 10,000 population, and the two smallestnumber less than five hundred souls each. But—where theres a will theres a clubhouse. A fine old colonial homestead in a glorious setting of elms and ever-greens is the home of Austin Tunstall Post of Brookfield, Massachusetts building of our own. Someone toldhim to pray for one and maybe he did,for he appointed a building committee.With the idea that it was better to livein a shack and be master of it, the com-mittee made plans for a building in thenature of a cabin orbarracks with a ten-nis court where afellow could spendhis Saturday after-noons and perhapsSunday morning,providing he got upearly enough. Be-ing a credit man, thechairman of thebuilding committeeexplained the needof money to buildeven a shack, so thepost undertook tohave a show at thelocal theater. Theshow was good, andthe slides and pic-tures, accompaniedwith the usual feefor such good adver-tising, made thegross receipts verysatisfactory. Quickly followingthis success, andwhile everyone wasoptimistic, an Ar-mistice Day carnivalwas held. Th