. The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade. Floriculture; Florists. Stocks for Graftmg. This subject seems to have inter- ested two very able gentlemen, who by their articles would seem to diverge some- what in their views. Mr. Thorpe asks for a stock which will give the best re- sults for flowering purposes in June. Why desire budded or grafted roses, when the roses on their own roots are in- finitely preferable in every particular either for June flowering or for producing blooms at any other season of the year? The question of time only becomes a factor in the case of new roses

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. The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade. Floriculture; Florists. Stocks for Graftmg. This subject seems to have inter- ested two very able gentlemen, who by their articles would seem to diverge some- what in their views. Mr. Thorpe asks for a stock which will give the best re- sults for flowering purposes in June. Why desire budded or grafted roses, when the roses on their own roots are in- finitely preferable in every particular either for June flowering or for producing blooms at any other season of the year? The question of time only becomes a factor in the case of new roses and slender growing teas. Whilst I admit the desirability of using stocks for graft- ing in the case of new or scarce roses I think it unwise and uuuecessary to re- sort to this method of propagation after our experieuce and practice in this coun- try the past twenty years. Regarding the suitableness of various stocks for the different classes of roses my experience is this: Manetti is very much better than Grififeraie for any class of roses; this last named stock is even worse than " dug" Briers in my estimation. If quick work is desired and new roses to be got in quantity then I say use Manetti stock, but if longevity and permanency in your tea varieties be desired, if you nmst have grafted roses, then use the seedling Brier, or as some call it Eglantine." There is little to be dreaded from suckers when roses are worked below the cotyledons of the seedling Eglantine, but it is nonsense to claim, as some do, that they will not sucker when thus worked. While talking about the Eglantine it might be well to mention that many of the H. P. class refuse to thrive on it, but not so with the slender growing teas; they seem to enjov the union for they thrive amazingly. Ma Capucine, Shirley Hib- berd, Le Nankin, and Primrose Dame thrive and flower finely on it. I know nothing of Caroliniana as a stock except as I have observed the Holland-grown roses which are annually b

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