. The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade. Floriculture; Florists. 374 The American Florist. Oct, 20 ducting his business at a loss if he does not compute these services at a fair ratio in estimating the cost of producing the commodity which he sells, and who is not able to sell his produce at a fair profit above the cost thus computed. The fact that his family works in the greenhouses and that he is saved thereby from hiring a man doete not benefit him in the least unless he sells his product at a price sufficient to cover the value of the services of his family, but on the con-

- Image ID: RP89XD
. The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade. Floriculture; Florists. 374 The American Florist. Oct, 20 ducting his business at a loss if he does not compute these services at a fair ratio in estimating the cost of producing the commodity which he sells, and who is not able to sell his produce at a fair profit above the cost thus computed. The fact that his family works in the greenhouses and that he is saved thereby from hiring a man doete not benefit him in the least unless he sells his product at a price sufficient to cover the value of the services of his family, but on the con-
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Image ID: RP89XD
. The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade. Floriculture; Florists. 374 The American Florist. Oct, 20 ducting his business at a loss if he does not compute these services at a fair ratio in estimating the cost of producing the commodity which he sells, and who is not able to sell his produce at a fair profit above the cost thus computed. The fact that his family works in the greenhouses and that he is saved thereby from hiring a man doete not benefit him in the least unless he sells his product at a price sufficient to cover the value of the services of his family, but on the con- trary he is depriving his own family of advantages to which it is entitled, and is actually making a present of the products of his own family's labor to his custo- mers. There is another item entering into the cost of producing and selling plants which is frequently overlooked, and that is, unsold stock at the end of the season, which must be destroyed or lost. If a florist produces 50,000 plants, sells only 40,000 of them and is obliged to lose theremaining 10,000, the entire amount which it cose to produce the 50,000 plants should be charged up as the cost of producing the 40,000. C.W. Ward. Another Lonsdale Wrinkle. Edwin Lonsdale uses a little contriv- ance for holding up his steam radiator pipes that seems destined to become universal. The usual cast iron fixture has the objection that if not put up per- fectly true the pipes, in expanding and contracting, are apt to grip the rest and gradually loosen the tixture from its fastening. Mr. Lonsdale's appliance consists of a six-inch wire nail and a piece of a '/i-inch iron pipe two inches in length slipped over the nail from the pomt. The spikes are then driven into the wall posts at an angle, so as to pre- vent the steam pipes from slipping off. The small pipes fit loosely on the spikes and act as rollers, turning readily as the steam pipes expand or contract. With these spikes it is easy to get the pipes to a perfect grad

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