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SUFFRAGE Fight for Women’s Voting in Pennsylvania USA 1915 Womens Liberty Bell Tour names associated with the women’s suffrage movement, Katharine Wentworth Ruschenberger’s is one of the least known. But her brilliant idea of a Liberty Bell replica dedicated to female suffrage – and her generosity in paying for it – were instrumental in the campaign for the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote. It was the culmination of one of the most controversial chapters of American history, spanning nearly 70 years. The bell would not be rung until women had achieved full suffrage.

SUFFRAGE Fight for Women’s Voting in Pennsylvania USA 1915 Womens Liberty Bell Tour names associated with the women’s suffrage movement, Katharine Wentworth Ruschenberger’s is one of the least known. But her brilliant idea of a Liberty Bell replica dedicated to female suffrage – and her generosity in paying for it – were instrumental in the campaign for the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote. It was the culmination of one of the most controversial chapters of American history, spanning nearly 70 years. The bell would not be rung until women had achieved full suffrage. Stock Photo
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Image details

Contributor:

Shawshots / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2G20AX6

File size:

39.2 MB (1 MB Compressed download)

Releases:

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Dimensions:

3722 x 3683 px | 31.5 x 31.2 cm | 12.4 x 12.3 inches | 300dpi

Date taken:

4 June 2021

Location:

state of Pennsylvania USA

More information:

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

Fight for Women’s Voting in Pennsylvania 1915 Womens Liberty Bell Tour names associated with the women’s suffrage movement, Katharine Wentworth Ruschenberger’s is one of the least known. But her brilliant idea of a Liberty Bell replica dedicated to female suffrage – and her generosity in paying for it – were instrumental in the campaign for the amendment 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote. It was the culmination of one of the most controversial chapters of American history, spanning nearly 70 years. The bell would not be rung until women had achieved full suffrage. In September of 1920, after the 19th amendment had been ratified, there was a huge ceremony for the ringing of the bell. Nearly a hundred women and girls participated in the pageant. At 4 p.m. on September 25, the bell was rung at Independence Hall. Throughout the state of Pennsylvania bells were rung in nearly every county simultaneously announcing a new era for women.

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