Woodrow Wilson and Edith Bolling Galt portraits cut in the shape of overlapping hearts with rose border; drawing of cupid in lower right and of the U.S. Capitol which is visible between the hearts. Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 - February 3, 19

- Image ID: G16DN8
Woodrow Wilson and Edith Bolling Galt portraits cut in the shape of overlapping hearts with rose border; drawing of cupid in lower right and of the U.S. Capitol which is visible between the hearts. Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 - February 3, 19
Science History Images / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: G16DN8
Woodrow Wilson and Edith Bolling Galt portraits cut in the shape of overlapping hearts with rose border; drawing of cupid in lower right and of the U.S. Capitol which is visible between the hearts. Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 - February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States, from 1913 to 1921. He served as President of Princeton University from 1902 to 1910, and then as the Governor of New Jersey from 1911 to 1913. Running against Theodore Roosevelt and Republican candidate William Howard Taft, Wilson was elected President as a Democrat in 1912. Edith Bolling Galt Wilson (October 15, 1872 - December 28, 1961) was the second wife of Woodrow Wilson, and First Lady of the United States from 1915 to 1921. In March 1915, the widow Galt was introduced to President Wilson by Helen Bones, the president's cousin and White House hostess since the death of Ellen Wilson, the president's first wife. They married nine months later. As First Lady during World War I, Mrs. Wilson observed gas-less Sundays, meatless Mondays, and wheat-less Wednesdays to set an example for the federal rationing effort. Similarly, she set sheep to graze on the White House lawn rather than waste manpower in mowing it and auctioned off their wool for the benefit of the American Red Cross. President Wilson suffered a severe stroke in October 1919. Edith Wilson began to screen all matters of state and decided which were important enough to bring to the bedridden president. In doing so, she functionally ran the Executive branch of the government for the remainder of the president's second term, until March 1921. She retired with the former president to their home, nursing him until his death three years later. She died of congestive heart failure at age 89 in 1961.