William Makepeace Thackeray (July 18, 1811 - December 24, 1863) was an English novelist of the 19th century. He studied law at the Middle Temple, but soon gave that up. On reaching the age of 21, he came into his inheritance but he squandered much of it o

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William Makepeace Thackeray (July 18, 1811 - December 24, 1863) was an English novelist of the 19th century. He studied law at the Middle Temple, but soon gave that up. On reaching the age of 21, he came into his inheritance but he squandered much of it o
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William Makepeace Thackeray (July 18, 1811 - December 24, 1863) was an English novelist of the 19th century. He studied law at the Middle Temple, but soon gave that up. On reaching the age of 21, he came into his inheritance but he squandered much of it on gambling and by funding two unsuccessful newspapers, The National Standard and The Constitutional. Forced to consider a profession to support himself, he turned first to art, which he studied in Paris, but did not pursue it except in later years as the illustrator of some of his own novels and other writings. He began as a satirist and parodist, writing papers with a sneaking fondness for roguish upstarts like Becky Sharp in Vanity Fair and the title characters of The Luck of Barry Lyndon and Catherine. He is best known now for Vanity Fair, with its deft skewerings of human foibles and its roguishly attractive heroine. During the Victorian era, Thackeray was ranked second only to Charles Dickens, but he is now much less read and is known almost exclusively for Vanity Fair. He died in 1863 at the age of 52.

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